Tag Archives: migration

Top 7 Reasons Organizations Should Not Automatically Switch to Hosted Enterprise Technology

Cloud with No Symbol
Not Cloud?

A college education can make you think differently.  As I read the original article, the many times my Statistics professors pointed out that anyone can basically lie with numbers to make them support whichever position they want. This was equally true in a class I took on Mass Persuasion and Propaganda.

Thus I present this same article, with an inversion of the concluded statistical results of the IDG survey, with minor modifications to the explanations given to suit the results of the measures.  Respect given to the original author, Tori Ballantine, who is a product marketing lead at Hyland Cloud.  No offense is intended by this grammatical exercise in statistical results inversion.

Original Article:

Top 7 Reasons Manufacturers Should Host Enterprise Technology
https://www.mbtmag.com/article/2018/07/top-7-reasons-manufacturers-should-host-enterprise-technology

Top 7 Reasons Organizations Should Not Automatically Switch to Hosted or Cloud Enterprise Technology

As one of the leading industries that was an early adopter of process automation, manufacturing is often ahead of the curve when it comes to seeking ways to improve processes — yet still has work to do in the technology adoption realm. While the trend for cloud adoption is increasing over on-premises solutions overall, some organizations, including manufacturers, are hesitant to make the transition to the cloud.

There are countless compelling reasons to transition to hosted enterprise applications. According to a recent survey from IDG, IT leaders at companies with 250+ employees, from a wide range of industries and company sizes, agreed on seven areas where cloud computing should benefit their organizations. These included:

Disaster Recovery

Disasters, both natural and man-made, are inherently unpredictable. When the worst-case scenario happens, organizations need improved disaster recovery capabilities in place — including the economic resources to replicate content in multiple locations. According to the IDG survey, about 33 percent, of IT leaders did not find disaster recovery as the number one reason they would move, or have moved to hosted enterprise solutions. By switching to a hosted solution, about 1/3 of organizations could not get their crucial application running as soon as possible after an emergent situation, and are therefore unable to serve their customers.

Data Availability

IT leaders know that data and content are essential components of their daily business operations. In fact, according to the IDG research, 45 percent of survey participant listed data availability as the second leading limitation cited about cloud enterprise applications being unable to provide. Access to mission-critical information, when they need it, wherever they are, is essential for organizations to stay competitive and provide uninterrupted service. With no noticeable increase to uptime compared to on-premises applications, hosted solutions did not provide 24/7/365 data availability.

Cost Savings

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that the third most popular reason IT leaders seek cloud solutions is because of cost savings. Hosting in the cloud eliminates the need for upfront investment in hardware and the expense of maintaining and updated hosting infrastructure by shifting the cost basis to long-term operational costs. While hosting software solutions on-premises carries more than just risk; it carries a fair amount of operational costs. By hosting enterprise solutions in the cloud, organizations will reduce capital costs with a possible reduction in operating costs — including staffing, overtime, maintenance and physical security when centralized under a hosting provider.

Incident Response

The IDG survey found that 55 percent of IT professionals listed incident response as another area where cloud solutions provided no significant benefit over on-premises options. Large-scale systems can develop more efficient incident response capabilities, and improve incident response times compared to smaller, non-consolidated systems. As seconds tick by, compliance fines can increase along with end-user dissatisfaction. So having a quick incident response time is essential to reduce risk and ensure end-user satisfaction.

Security Expertise

The best providers that offer hosted solutions constantly evaluate and evolve their practices to protect customers’ data. This is crucial because up to 59 percent of IDG survey responders noted that security expertise as another leading reason they do not select cloud applications. Organizations with cloud-hosted applications could take advantage of the aggregated security expertise from their vendors to improve their own operations and make sure information is safe, but only by complying with externally-driven security standards that were either not enforceable due to application restrictions (legacy versioning, design constraints, third-party non-compliant architecture, et.al.) To ensure your content stays safe, it’s important to seek cloud providers with the right credentials — look for certifications such as SOC 1 and 2 or 3 audited, ISO 27001 and CSA STAR Registrant.

Geographical Disbursement

The IDG survey found that over 63 percent of IT professionals were not seeking geographical disbursement in where their data is stored. In the event of data unavailability in a local data center, having a copy of the data in a separate geographical area ensures performance and availability of the data sources, though resources to use the data may not be readily available as they are co-located in the local region of the primary data.

Expert Access

IT professionals seek hosted solutions because the best hosted software applications employ top-notch security professionals. Gaining access to these professionals’ insight helps ensure concerns are addressed and the software delivers on the organization’s needs.

In order to facilitate the best possible experience for your customers, it’s important to keep up with technology trends that give you the data and insights you need to provide quality service. For many firms, it means not only focusing on process automation on the manufacturing floor, but also within the internal processes driven by data. There’s a huge shift happening with how organizations choose to deploy software. In fact, according to a recent AIIM study, almost 25% of respondents from all industries are not seeking to deploy cloud software in any fashion. 60 percent of those surveyed plan to focus on a non-hybrid approach, focusing primarily on leveraging on-premises deployments, while 38 percent said they will deploy cloud solutions.

As noted in the seven areas above, the reasons for the lack of shift to selecting hosted enterprise applications are diverse and compelling. The cloud provides users with greater access to their information, when and where they need to access it — and doesn’t confine users to a on-premise data source. When combined with the other benefits of improved business continuity, cost savings, incident response, security expertise and expert access, organizations should carefully consider that their important information and content is more available and secure in the cloud.

 

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How to migrate EM12c R3 OMS and repository to a new host

Very useful, even if you’re moving parts of OEM 12c from one host to another, or modifying the filesystem mounts.

Pardy DBA

(EDIT 20130917: If you simply need to change the IP address of your OEM server, please review MOS note 1562029.1.  The procedure in that note may allow you to change your OEM server’s IP address without following the lengthy process I describe below.)

In order to save power in our data center, I need to migrate my EM12c R3 environment from the host where it currently runs to a new host.  I have a simple configuration, with a single OMS, no load balancer, and the repository database runs on the same host as EM12c R3 itself.  I also have BI Publisher installed and integrated with EM12c, and a few third party plugins as I’ve detailed elsewhere on this blog.  If you use an OS other than Linux x86-64 I suggest you research thoroughly as this procedure may or may not apply to your environment.  Further, if you have a multi-OMS…

View original post 3,770 more words

Moving off of Microsoft Office Live Small Business (Website Hosting)

Microsoft is one of those “Great relationship while it lasted” kind of things. Missed in one of my live.com honeypot e-mail Inboxes was a missive about “At Microsoft we love you …but we’re discontinuing Office Live Small Business starting February 2012.

Read more on this OLSB blog while it’s still up: http://small-business.web.officelive.com/default.aspx#O365replaceOLSB Image

Anyway, so I went about figuring out how to move this massively IIS-oriented site which leveraged tons of pre-built widgets in OLSB:

To somewhere else: https://sites.google.com/site/jhlui12/

Image

Open the OLSB website in a browser. Save each page using File -> Save… [Webpage, complete]
This creates a copy of the base page, with a folder containing all of the images and CSS sheets in-use. (e.g. default.aspx.htm and [default.aspx_files])

Fix the References:
Using Firefox was more successful and IE8/9, which complained about being unable to save everything properly.

Open the HTML file (e.g. default.aspx.htm) in a text editor:
Search for jameslui.org -> replace with “.” (make current domain dynamic)
Search for .aspx” -> .aspx.htm” (change to HTML file reference)
Search for %_files/ -> images/ (migrated all *_files directories to a single images/ folder for ease of transport)

Needed to freeze the header as a banner.jpg for the time being until figuring out how to code the header.

Easiest so far seems to be to open the html version in another browser.

Set the new page layout to be sort of close to the original (Layout -> 1/2/3-column w/Left or Right sidebars).

Copy/paste from the html version frames to the new frame in Google Sites. Some images come over, but usually need to be re-uploaded into Google sites to get the references correct.

Forms are registered as data entry forms in Google Docs Spreadsheet Forms (which are spreadsheets with a single-row data entry page); Once re-created as a Spreadsheet Form, you can use Insert Spreadsheet Form to place it into the website.

Change Site Layout:

Horizontal navigation (checked) – have to add each page to go across the menu individually.

Sidebar (unchecked) – gets rid of the menu on the side.

Couldn’t really embed a WAV audio file. Can upload to Google Docs and create a Share link for it. Or attach files as Attachments to the page.

Sub-Tab/Sub-Menus
Layout Left-Sidebar to insert a Sub-page navigator that floats correctly.
Used 100 pixel width; no Title <leave blank>; Appearance: Traditional TOC

Fast text reformat – place “–” delimiters in proper paragraph break places. Replace ^p with <space>, Replace “–” with ^p^p, Replace ^p<space> with ^p

Forms are semi-editable. To Change Field Order, Open the Spreadsheet (SS), Open the Form Edit Window (but don’t close either one).
Return to the SS, Form -> Delete, Return to the Form Editor, change something, Save, the SS version should update accordingly and re-connect itself. Cannot do much about spacing or field width so far.

The Google Sites editor isn’t exactly WYSIWYG – getting those widgets and images to stay put where you want them can be a little daunting unless you crack open the raw HTML and disconnect the Themes and Templates from the site. But keep playing with Left/Right/Center Justification on an object, usually with Wrap ON and it will flow better.

One strength of Google Sites is that it is pre-built for designing Mobile-compatible sites. So the emphasis is NOT on making everything 800×600 pixel formatted automatically anymore. You should be able to re-size the browser and still be able to read the page regardless of browser window size. That’s a Mobile-ready configuration.

One page/sub-page at a time, some easier than others, and eventually it’s done!  Have patience!

Another example, here’s the migrated version of the Southwest Regional Oracle Applications Users Group (SROAUG) site:

http://www.sroaug.org

versus the OLSB version:

http://southwestregionaloracleapplicationsusergroup.tech.officelive.com