2015-April Shinnyo Podcast Elevations and Heightened Expectations

2015-April Shinnyo Podcast Elevations and Heightened Expectations

  • Paradise, Almost.
  • Embracement and Nothingness
  • Waking up and Making Some Coffee (not just thinking about it)

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Lou Lawrence, Port Angeles WA US
Lou Lawrence, Port Angeles WA US

““I hear that this month practitioners are getting ready for my birthday celebration. I’m grateful that you all want to express your appreciation to me in this way. But what I hope for more than anything is for all people to live with joy in their lives. I pray that you will take this occasion as an opportunity to take action so that even one more person can find joy in the world around them.”

— Master Shinjo Ito, 1973

About this same time last year, I described the general process of spiritual elevation at Shinnyo-en and conceptually what it was about. At last month’s meditative sitting, our spiritual guide had a few interesting observations about the Los Angeles training that were worth sharing. He had travelled from Japan, first stopping up in San Francisco, and then Chicago and now in Los Angeles. The first 2 stops were typical of this time of year – still fairly cold and either rainy or snowy outside, and a general feeling of people still hibernating, so to speak. But upon arrival in Los Angeles, whereupon he was greeted with 90+F temperatures, and even now, a rain-less, overly sunny climate that defies historical record, he said “this must be a form of Paradise!”

During our training, he felt we shared a brightness and warmth similar to the weather outside, with much happiness and joy throughout the group. But as the meditation deepened, he felt the room growing darker and dimmer, and our corresponding moods and spirits turning inward and more self-centered. It’s as if we started out with a sense of communal support and joy for our training, and then shifted towards a much more singular “I must elevate. Must focus my thoughts. Be determined.” mindset. And while this sort of internally-centered focus works well for the beginning stages of learning to meditate and clear your mental dissonance, it really doesn’t work to develop the openness and compassion needed to develop embracement and oneness.

Often we find ourselves in this odd balance between the chicken and egg syndrome of sharpening our own mental and spiritual awareness, but at the same time, not shutting out the rest of the world, and ultimately compassion, in the process. it’s a little like the Zen concept of “learn everything, then learn to know nothing.” Learning to accept not only ourselves (which is an important first step), but also the rest of the universe as it is, where it is, and what it is – means embracement (jpn. Shoju or Shojou) in its truest sense.

Remember that when we pay respects to our spiritual figures, we do so as a gentle reminder that we wish to change not only ourselves, but inspire others to have aspirations and positive hope, just as the figure of the Ever-Present Tathagata Shakyamuni represents the timelessness and universality of the Buddha’s enlightenment, in other words, the potential of all people to bring forth their own innate potential (aka buddha nature) to awaken.

To become one with G*d, to walk in Christ’s footsteps, embrace Tao,

Moss or Forest?
Moss or Forest?

develop buddha nature, or simply be a good person – whatever you end up calling the process of incorporating compassionate practice into your daily life, it is the steps you take each and every moment that lead you somewhere else, and not the imagining what it will be like to get there.

“No matter where you go, there you are.”
— Confucius, Buckaroo Banzai, Luca Bloom, et.al.

/* For more information and discussion feel free to e-mail me at jlui at jlui dot net, or twitter @jhlui1; With Gassho _()_, James*/

#C15LV Collaborate 2015 Networking Opportunity Events

Where I can keep track of the special events (note: these are not “parties” as so many people are misled to believe) at Collaborate (April 11-16, 2015 – Las Vegas, Nevada). To attend one of these events:

  1. You’re registered as an Collaborate Attendee.
  2. You’re either a prospect, customer, or goodwill contact for the host.
  3. You visit the host’s booth at Collaborate in order to pick up whatever is required for entry.
  4. Do not just show up at the event and attempt to “crash” it – just spend your time at a regular #C15LV reception the same evening and you’ll still get plenty of party time.

My sessions for this year:

Upgraded Front Brake – Suzuki S40 Boulevard (2013)

DSCF4548Ever search for photos of a Suzuki S40 (nee’ LS650 Savage) and notice everybody shoots from right-side of the bike?SUZUKI-Boulevard-S40-6390_4suzuki205042015553012

I personally think that’s because we’re all painfully aware of how woefully inadequate the 30+ year old solid single front-disc with a single pot caliper has been (especially when freeway speeds started jumping up.) And why would you want to take a photo of something that heats up too fast, feels spongy, even with better brake lines, and isn’t so bad tooling around and cruising at low speeds, but feels like you’re riding a Schwinn Stingray (wherein your rear drum brake locks up, and skids along, while the front is still grabbing air.)

But because of a rather creative genius in the automotive engineering world, he introduces this:

20150320_102028_sm
Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Full Left-side Photo
20150319_165621_sm
Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Front Left-side Photo
20150319_165543_sm
Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Focus Left-side Photo

And now Suzuki S40 and LS 650 (and Ryca conversion) owners can have fully-floating rebuildable discs with dual-pot calipers and bring their bikes into the 21st century (or at least into the last decade of the 20th, if you prefer.)  It’s not ABS (which would cost more than the whole bike) but it’s a welcome upgrade that bolts-on (literally) and is very well-engineered and designed using already proven technology (just assembled in a different way, with an engineer’s eye towards functionality and purpose).

It’s affordable, and just what this little kicker needed among the plethora of engine-specific upgrades that already address more horsepower (web cams, big bore kits, bigger carburetors and jetting, revised exhausts, etc.).

Now you can safely stop this thing.

Sandor (aka Shawn) is one very creative engineer.

Original post (on SuzukiSavage.com): http://suzukisavage.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1391549028/0

http://suzukisavage.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1391549028/0
RycaShawn’s original 2014 post on SuzukiSavage.com – with continual development updates on making it affordable and even more practical.

 

2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understandi

2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact – 2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact Responding to Icky Moments 1 -> 10 -> 10 million Every Seed is Important Try Not to Watch Your Pot When Boiling Water A Snowflake Starts an Avalanche Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard There are many inconsistent and confusing examples of contradictory spiritual behavior … Continue reading 2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact → http://ow.ly/2VjYzP

2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact

2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact

  • Responding to Icky Moments
  • 1 -> 10 -> 10 million
  • Every Seed is Important
  • Try Not to Watch Your Pot When Boiling Water
  • A Snowflake Starts an Avalanche

Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard

rain_bird
Found on YouTube

There are many inconsistent and confusing examples of contradictory spiritual behavior in the world. We seem to have buddhist monks behaving aggressively in Myanmar, people beheading people in the name of a belief system, children with explosives strapped to themselves being sent as human bomb carriers, and in Japan, toxins were unleashed on the public in a subway all in the name of a religion or belief system. 1,000 years ago, we had the Crusades marching across a continent in the name of spiritual liberation. Last month we talked about alignment between actions and our principles. But what exactly happens when misalignment occurs?

When we witness behavior that is contrary to our beliefs, humans generate a typical “fight or flight” emotional response. This is part of our built-in survival mechanism to avoid things that make us shudder, go “Eeek!” or “Blechh!” and generally keep us sane because we reinforce our own belief system. If you were in a constant state of questioning your own beliefs, you might find yourself overwhelmed by a sense of confusion or disarray in a very short time. But these are all short-term and immediate responses to aversive behavior. What I find more interesting is the relationship between these exposures to repellant behavior and what we call Karma or the concept of how positive and negative actions have impact over time.

Let’s say someone is harmed or killed in the name of a particular belief, that is the victim is perceived as being an enemy of the beliefs, or otherwise would cause some kind of harm to it. And the person who causes the harm or death is not directly impacted or addressed by their actions, meaning a witness or onlooker doesn’t see an individual person as the cause of the negative action –  we don’t perceive someone specific to blame for the incident. To keep this example simple, 10 random people witness this act. What happens in these 10 different impressions of the action of one person? What happens when this same act is magnified by media coverage to expose this same act to 10 million random people? What if it were just you, who saw what happened?  What would you do? What would you say to others? What if you did absolutely nothing?

The parents, family, friends, and even enemies of the person who performed the act above have impressions, too. And each of those people create a downstream effect of how that act will be perceived by generation upon generation of others. Was it good or bad? Was it righteous or tyrannical? Was it selfish, or generous? Each of these individuals contributes to future actions of whether this one act will be repeated in the future, and to what extent it will occur (positive perception generally leads to magnification of the effort).

In the nature of cause and effect, each of the above actions or inactions results in something else. The seed that doesn’t get planted, doesn’t result in a plant, which doesn’t have roots that hold soil, which results in:

  • the dirt can more easily be washed away in the rain,
  • one fewer plant to grow and filter the air,
  • one fewer parent plant to produce seeds,
  • less shade on the ground leading to hotter soil temperatures,
  • one fewer plant to act as a home to a few insects,
  • and so on.

plant_in_hand_thYet, all it takes is one positive act to have the same and opposite effect. Whether you “Do unto others..,” “Pay it Forward,” watch for “Butterfly Effects” or plant a seed, things start to happen when you do something. The odd and sometimes frustrating thing is that in all of these actions, there is no guarantee of instant gratification of seeing the results of your action. It may happen centuries in the future. This is why detachment from attachments is emphasized in philosophy; try to not have the expectation of a result every time you cause something to happen. By becoming an agent of change, you automatically subscribe to the results – you really don’t need to sit around and wait for the “Lessons Learned” meeting to happen.

Photo courtesy of Earth Science Picture of the Day @esra.edu
Photo courtesy of Earth Science Picture of the Day @esra.edu

The concept of inertial change isn’t new. Over 40 years ago, John Naisbitt wrote about Megatrends and studied how they occur and what we can learn from them. 40,000 years ago, someone scratched into the wall of a cave that a big four-legged animal might be a thing to eat and feed a village, or you could plant something and get a similar result. Ultimately, how do you react to things and how do you affect your downstream relationships (all 10 generations worth)?

/* For more information and discussion feel free to e-mail me at jlui at jlui dot net, or twitter @jhlui1; With Gassho _()_, James*/

Using Demo Data for Oracle Data Mining Tools

With the forthcoming (but already available) SQLDeveloper 4.1 edition, an improved version of the Oracle Data Miner tools is incorporated into the SQLDeveloper console.  However, I found that there were a number of steps needed to actually use this new data modeling product other than just responding ‘Yes’ to the “Do you wish to enable the Data Miner Repository on this database?” prompt.

Here’s what I ended up doing to get things up and running (so that I could play with data modeling and visualization using Excel and the new SQLDeveloper DM extensions.)

#In this case, I’m adding back the demonstration data (i.e. EMP, DEPTNO type tables; the SH, OE, HR, et.al. schemas) into an existing R12 e-Business Suite (12.1.3) instance.

# Installing the Oracle Demo data in an R12 instance.

# Use the runInstaller from the R12 $ORACLE_HOME
cd $ORACLE_HOME/oui/bin
export DISPLAY=<workstation IP>:0.0
./runInstaller

# Choose the source products.xml from the staging area – Download and stage the DB Examples CD from OTN
/mnt/nfs/database/11203/examples/stage/products.xml

# Complete the OUI installation through [Finish]

cd $ORACLE_HOME/demo/schema
mkdir -p $ORACLE_HOME/demo/schema/log
echo $ORACLE_HOME/demo/schema/log/     ## used to respond to the Log Directory prompt during mksample.sql

sqlplus “/ as sysdba”
— will need passwords for: SYS/SYSTEM and APPS (used for all of the demo schemas, some of which pre-exist such as, HR, OE (PM, IX, SH and BI were okay for 12.1.3).

— ## Be sure to comment out any DROP USER <HR, OE, etc.) commands in this script (or you will be restoring your EBS instance from a backup because it just dropped your Module schema tables…) ##
— They look like this:
/*
mksample.sql:– DROP USER hr CASCADE;
mksample.sql:– DROP USER oe CASCADE;
mksample.sql:DROP USER pm CASCADE;
mksample.sql:DROP USER ix CASCADE;
mksample.sql:DROP USER sh CASCADE;
mksample.sql:DROP USER bi CASCADE;
*/

–Similarly – if/when you decide you no longer need the data – do NOT just use the $ORACLE_HOME/demo/schema/drop_sch.sql script
–or you just dropped your HR/OE/BI EBS schemas; don’t do that.
/*
drop_sch.sql:PROMPT Dropping Sample Schemas
drop_sch.sql:– DROP USER hr CASCADE;
drop_sch.sql:– DROP USER oe CASCADE;
drop_sch.sql:DROP USER pm CASCADE;
drop_sch.sql:DROP USER ix CASCADE;
drop_sch.sql:DROP USER sh CASCADE;
drop_sch.sql:DROP USER bi CASCADE;

order_entry/oe_main.sql:– Dropping the user with all its objects
order_entry/oe_main.sql:– DROP USER oe CASCADE;
order_entry/oe_main.sql:– ALTER USER oe DEFAULT TABLESPACE &tbs QUOTA UNLIMITED ON &tbs;

*/
— in this instance the $APPS_PW is synchronized to all application module schemas (i.e. AR, HR, GL, etc.)
— log directory would be the actual path from echo $ORACLE_HOME/demo/schema/log/ (including the trailing slash)
SQL> @mksample.sql

# to additionally create the Data Mining user (DM in this case)

create user &&dmuser identified by &&dmuserpwd
default tablespace &&usertblspc
temporary tablespace &&temptblspc
quota unlimited on &&usertblspc;

GRANT CREATE JOB TO &&dmuser;
GRANT CREATE MINING MODEL TO &&dmuser;       — required for creating models
GRANT CREATE PROCEDURE TO &&dmuser;
GRANT CREATE SEQUENCE TO &&dmuser;
GRANT CREATE SESSION TO &&dmuser;
GRANT CREATE SYNONYM TO &&dmuser;
GRANT CREATE TABLE TO &&dmuser;
GRANT CREATE TYPE TO &&dmuser;
GRANT CREATE VIEW TO &&dmuser;
GRANT EXECUTE ON ctxsys.ctx_ddl TO &&dmuser;
GRANT CREATE ANY DIRECTORY TO &&dmuser;
— Grant the SH Demo table and package objects to the DM user
@?/rdbms/demo/dmshgrants.sql &&dmuser

connect &&dmuser/&&dmuserpwd
— Create the Data Mining Views against the  SH Demo table and package objects
@?/rdbms/demo/dmsh.sql

@?/rdbms/demo/dmabdemo.sql — Builds the Adaptive Baynes Model demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmaidemo.sql — Builds the Attribute Importance demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmardemo.sql — Builds the Association Rules demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmdtdemo.sql — Builds the Decision Tree demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmdtxvlddemo.sql — Builds the Cross Validation demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmglcdem.sql — Builds the Generalized Linear model demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmglrdem.sql — Builds the General Linear Regression model demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmhpdemo.sql — not a Data Mining program – Hierarchical Profiler
@?/rdbms/demo/dmkmdemo.sql — Builds the K-Means Clustering model demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmnbdemo.sql — Builds the Naive Baynes Model data
@?/rdbms/demo/dmnmdemo.sql — Builds the Non-negative Matrix Factorization model
@?/rdbms/demo/dmocdemo.sql — Builds the O-Cluster model Demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmsvcdem.sql — Builds the Support Vector Machine model demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmsvodem.sql — Builds the One-Class Support Vector Machine model demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmsvrdem.sql — Builds the Support Vector Regression model demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmtxtfe.sql — Builds the Oracle Text Term Feature Extractor demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmtxtnmf.sql — Builds the Text Mining Non-Negative Matrix Factorization model demo
@?/rdbms/demo/dmtxtsvm.sql — Builds the Text Mining Support Vector Machine model demo

## End of Data Mining Demo user (DM) setup and configuration for use of Oracle Demo Data

2015-February Shinnyo Podcast – Taking A

2015-February Shinnyo Podcast – Taking Action – 2015-February Shinnyo Podcast – Taking Action         How Actions Lead to Perception         Consistent Form -> Consistent Results         The Rules of Engagement Require Actual Engagement         You Are What You Do         Taking the Next Step Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard From an address by Her Holiness, Keishu Shinso at the commencement of this … Continue reading 2015-February Shinnyo Podca… http://ow.ly/2UokCB

2015-February Shinnyo Podcast – Taking Action

2015-February Shinnyo Podcast – Taking Action

  •         How Actions Lead to Perception
  •         Consistent Form -> Consistent Results
  •         The Rules of Engagement Require Actual Engagement
  •         You Are What You Do
  •         Taking the Next Step

Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard

action_thFrom an address by Her Holiness, Keishu Shinso at the commencement of this year’s Annual Training period on January 25, 2015:

“Shinnyo refers to the qualities that we find exemplified in the lives of the Shinnyo Parents and the Two Dojis, most prominently in the way they demonstrated what it means to embody a spirit that is selfless, unbowed, and full of harmony. Shinnyo Ichinyo (oneness with truth) is about the effort that we make to express these qualities of shinnyo in our daily life, and by so doing, we are always connected with our spiritual masters”

Spirituality is often interpreted as being an internalized concept in that while various groups of people will have a common belief system, it is the beliefs and practices of the individual that comprise how the philosophy impacts the rest of the world.  We see that demonstrated in our contemporary life by the acts of a few individuals affecting the impressions that others form about a whole religion, or even simply the label of alliance with a philosophy. Whether or not the actions by those individuals are conscribed or taught by the actual philosophy are not part of the perception.

This is often illustrated in many idioms and proverbs:

  •         Do as I say, not as I do.
  •         Actions speak louder than words.
  •         It’s the thought that counts (implying, not the action, or lack thereof).

Effectively, these are saying, “Take my advice, even though I am acting contrary to it.” (Sometimes used as an apology for behaving hypocritically.) – McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

What most philosophical schools teach is that individual actions should always strive to be in alignment with the principles of conduct, or the laws of commonly decent behavior. In Buddhism, these are illustrated as the Dharma, which comes in many different expressions:

Four Noble Truths

  •         There is suffering
  •         A source of suffering.
  •         The cessation of suffering
  •         Attainment of Nirvana

Five Cardinal Sins

  •         Killing one’s father,
  •         …mother,
  •         …a saint,
  •         Injuring a Buddha,
  •         Disturbing the Sangha

8-fold Noble Path

  •         Right views
  •         …thoughts,
  •         …speech,
  •         …acts,
  •         …livelihood,
  •         …efforts,
  •         …mindfulness,
  •         …meditation

And others.

Nonetheless, memorizing the guidelines becomes pointless if actions taken aren’t in alignment with what performance is expected. We know children pick up on this concept rather quickly at a young age. If parents always say to do something, but either don’t do it themselves, or don’t make efforts to correct or demonstrate desired behavior, kids figure out, “they say it, but they don’t really mean it.” And likewise, so do our pet dogs and cats, and even our co-workers.  We learn from the actions we observe, and much less so, the words we read or hear.

Similarly, we also learn more from our own actions (and mistakes) much more than from what we write, or say. Repeated actions reinforce memory. Learning how to golf takes practice, and that doesn’t mean watching videos or reading books about it. The “muscle memory” comes from repeated guidance in the correct form (or conversely, incorrect form repeated over and over leads to really lousy golf scores.)

Returning to our sales-related analogy, once you have assessed the needs of the customer and figured out a solution that would address them, you have to actually finish the transaction (“seal the deal”, follow-through, make it happen.)  In a nutshell, if you don’t take action to write the sale up, you go home with less pay, thus there’s a direct positively correlated relationship between taking action and personal gain.

In life, the relationship is not so clear to those who don’t take action. But as in physics, not taking action is in and of itself another action. And there are consequences for inaction, too. And every action should emanate from a compassionate source or it tends to have an opposite effect.

In Shinnyo Buddhism this belief in action has been distilled into three basic practices:

  •         Connecting to others (jpn. otasuke)
  •         Making voluntary effort (jpn. gohoshi)
  •         Contributing time or value (jpn. kangi)

Just as the symbolism of cleaning things and places is also referred to as “polishing our hearts”, it is the actions that when repeated and reinforced through positive guidance that lead to actual transition, and transformation.

Java 7 (1.7.0_) and Java 6 on the Same Workstation for R12 e-Business Suite EBS and other Apps

The challenge: We have a number of 3rd party Cloud applications that are still on Java 6, so we have that version (1.6.0_26 specifically) deployed to our workstations. We configured R12 to use 1.6.0_26 on the server side to minimize impact to the users. We are now implementing Informatica Information Lifecycle Management (an archive and purge technology), which has a component (the Enterprise Data Manager – EDM) which is a Java 7-based application used by certain administrative and analyst users. We needed to have those users support both Java 7 and Java 6 on the same workstation for the browsers (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome).

Starting with a Windows 7 (32-bit) workstation with a working Java 1.6.0_26 installed (and 1.6.0_7 disabled).

Used the Java SE 7 SDK from the Oracle Java Archive (staged to the DBA Share /Software/Java because the 7 downloadables will be pulled from the site as of April-2015):

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/archive-139210.html

Chose: Java SE Development Kit 7u25 (includes the JRE runtime edition) – newer versions (post- and including update 40) contain an non-bypassable Security Warning message for using Java 6 applications.

Installed Java 7 using default parameters and completed successfully.

Open the Java Control Panel (available in the Toolbar, as the Java coffee cup icon, if a Java application is already running – e.g. EBS; or via Control Panel -> Java)

Preferred Enabled settings under the [Java] tab -> View…

06a_java_cpanel

06_java_7_and_6_versions_cpanel

De-select the Java Plug-in (next-generation) features (due to co-existence with Java 6) – we also turn off Automatic Java Updates, and default the automatic JNLP MIME/execution association setting to make it easier for users:

07_java_7_adv_tab_disable_next_gen_cpanel

Launch Informatica EDM:

04_java_launch_ilm_edm_ss

Java Update Needed – Check (Do not ask again) -> Select -> Later

01_java_upd_needed_ss

Choose default launcher for EDM’s JNLP (also can be defaulted in the Java Control Panel -> Advanced settings)

05_java_launch_ilm_edm_pick_app_ss

EDM Launches:

02_java_launch_edm_ss

03_java_launch_edm__success_ss

Launching R12 e-Business Suite under Java 6:

Launch Forms Session (Profile -> System used as an example)

Security Warning – due to Java having incomplete Certificate Authority trust to the Aramark Hosts (can be addressed also via Control Panel -> Java -> [Security] -> Manage Certificates -> Import Certificate -> add certificates provided by AUS Server Team (password required).

The Java 7 update 25 warning looks like this (click the Activate Java link; then on the next pop-up click Allow and Remember – to suppress future warning messages):

01b_java_upd_needed_pre40_ss

The post-Java 7 update 40 warning looks like this (select – I accept the risk; click [Run]):

08_java_launch_ebs_sec_warn_ss

Ref: http://java.com/en/download/faq/signed_code.xml

Why don’t I see the option to select Do not show this again for this app in the security dialog for an unsigned application?

Starting with Java 7 Update 40, the option to select Do not show this again for this app is no longer available. Unlike previous versions a user cannot suppress the security dialog for an unsigned application and will have to select the option, I accept the risk and want to run this app, each time to run the unsigned application.

Security Warning – these will come up twice in a row – once when the R12 forms servlet is instantiating and a second time when the actual Forms launch. Once Allow this application to run with the requested version (1.6.0_26) is selected, these warnings should be suppressed in future sessions.

09_java_launch_ebs_sec_warn2_run_6_ss

R12 and EDM simultaneously launched successfully.

11_java_launch_ebs_ilm_success_ss

2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness

2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness of Needs – 2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness of Needs Defining Selflessness Qualifying our Conversations Know Yourself as You Get to Know Others The Difficult Task of Acting as Themselves Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard From the Shinnyo 2015 Annual Guidance notes: This year’s items of practice: Contributing to the world through selfless … Continue reading 2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness … http://ow.ly/2SRP2S

2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness of Needs

2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness of Needs

  • Defining Selflessness
  • Qualifying our Conversations
  • Know Yourself as You Get to Know Others
  • The Difficult Task of Acting as Themselves

Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard

Hitsuji - Year of the Sheep
calligraphy by Shinso Ito

From the Shinnyo 2015 Annual Guidance notes:

This year’s items of practice:

  1. Contributing to the world through selfless acts
  2. Nurturing good roots through practice

Guidelines are simple, until you read them. Let’s take a look at “selfless acts”  By definition those would be acts for anyone (or anything) other than yourself.  But if you thought someone needed something, isn’t that a selfless act? When you look in a mirror are you able to see yourself as others see you? This is why doctors and scientists invest so much of their education learning diagnostic and forensic routines, because really what you see and perceive is being filtered through a mind that was produced as the sum total of your entire life’s experiences (good and bad), and that results in an alteration of the perception.

The observation that “we are our own worst critics” is another way to see the same dilemma. We can’t judge ourselves very accurately nor constructively, so how good can we be at judging others? How can we possibly guess what the other person’s need is if we can’t trust our own perception of that need? We listen to the other person. By listening carefully and with clarification of what we are hearing, we can come much closer to an accurate, if less self-satisfying answer.

[reit: the model of the sales cycle is used herein because the accuracy of the communication cycle directly and measurably relates to the satisfaction level of both parties involved, whether material, financial or even emotional satisfaction with the process – in other words, it’s simpler to study and understand]

Continuing the discussion of the principles of selling, in order to “qualify the customer,” we intend to determine several things; () will indicate the sales-related concepts:

  • Identify the person’s needs (what do they want to achieve)
  • Determine if anything we have to offer would fulfill any of those needs (what do we sell that meets that want)
  • Establish ability for the person to adopt fulfillment of the need (are they willing to buy it)
  • Find out if the person is willing to pursue the change needed complete the transaction.(write up the sale)

Note that not one of these asks, “Can the person afford what we are selling?” “Does the person have actual skill or talent needed to use what they are buying?”  That’s the big difference between basic selling and the basis for this podcast – setting a good example for others through living. Selling is about addressing immediate needs, often because in a competitive market, you can never be sure how loyal a customer can be for each and every sale. We might feel better as a customer, if the salesperson simply said, “You know… I don’t recommend you buy this. You’ll never really be able to do with it what you want to accomplish.”  But that salesperson’s livelihood depends on the sales dollars, and not so much good (or bad) advice.

The odd thing is we often approach giving support to others in the same fashion. We take a guess at what they are trying to achieve, and immediately try to provide a solution that in our mind would solve everything. That would be akin to having a conversation with a friend such as,

“Hi, how are you doing?”

“I’m okay. Just a little depressed these days.”

“I know. Just follow these 12 steps, join this program, and start doing this training course, and you’ll be all better forever! Just follow me, and sign here.”

In our interactions with others, it always reinforces the likelihood of having a successful communication by listening first. If you feel motivated to start a conversation with a someone because you wanted to vent about how stressful life had become, or to listen to all of your recent triumphs and accomplishments, that conversation would probably be better received if you asked permission of the other person first, “I just had a horrible experience. Do you mind listening?” And be sure that response is an affirmative, “Yes, I’m ready to listen,” and not a qualified, “Yeah, sure.”
By starting with self-reflection, whether through meditation, counseling groups, journaling, or whatever works for you, the discovery of what makes you move, feel and grow (or conversely shrink, avoid and immobilize) leads to transformation of how you deal with others, and ultimately reinforcement of every relationship you share with others.

This reminds me of an interesting observation about actors and acting (which often comes up during the “Why do we want to become an actor?” portion of many introductory workshops on the subject.) Actors are often more comfortable being extremely detailed and emotionally-rich when playing anyone other than themselves. That’s not to say they don’t like themselves, or don’t like looking into mirrors. But they develop a certain skill at being able to portray a character with amplified attributes, and can emotionally invest in that character in a way which is not as simple to do with themselves.

Why does it feel safer to play a homicidal maniac (or hopelessly romantic) character than dealing with one’s own neuroses and troubles? Because actors have their own “safe word” – the director says, “Cut!” In life, we are the only ones who have the true capacity to tell ourselves, “Cut!” – meaning that’s enough, you did it, let’s move on.  Psychologically, when you know there’s an end to the pain, madness, sadness, endless joy, or any of these hyperbolic emotional states, it’s easier for you to “go there” and realize you can come back.  When you “go there” and don’t come back, we term that as psychosis, and identifying that by yourself is pretty difficult.

In buddhism, we talk about how we are the product of 10 prior generations of our ancestry. That’s how far back (or far forward) every action you or someone else takes, affects someone else, whether you know them or not (and most likely, not.) The reasoning behind the generations is because as a communal species, we reproduce generally with those whom have had a significant influence on our lives. If ten generations of lovingkindness and care-filled harmonious parentage produced you, the likelihood that you’re pretty worry-free and emotionally content is pretty high. For those of us with a less than perfect 10 generation lineage (which is about 99.999998% of people), there’s many reasons we feel the need for dependency, infidelity, lying, stealing or attraction to wealth, power, elitism and arrogance. We can point a finger at any of those 10 generations worth of individuals and declare, “Hah! That’s why I do that!”  Or, you can take action and do something about it.

For completeness, this year’s 2015 annual guideline is:

As we enhance Oyasono,
Let us further share the light of saisho—as revealed in shinnyo
In the spirit of upholding the Dharma.

If you Care a Little More, Things Happen. Bees can be dangerous. Always wear protective clothing when approaching or dealing with bees. Do not approach or handle bees without proper instruction and training.

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