@Oracle R12 EBS HTTP Server Error Child Could Not Open Sslmutex Lockfile

HTTP Server Error “Child Could Not Open Sslmutex Lockfile” (Doc ID 562624.1) addresses a non-critical, but annoying issue (because it tends to fill up the $INST_TOP/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache directory with big error logs every day – every mouse click on a OA Framework page generates an error entry).

mod_ossl: Child could not open SSLMutex lockfile /apps/oracle/oas/10.1.3.1/Apache/Apache/logs/ssl_mutex.10549 (System error follows)
System: No such file or directory (errno: 2)

And sort of randomly, your HTTP service will show “Stop” on the adapcctl.sh status screen. But it’s probably still actually running (the processes still show up when ps -ef | grep httpd – and the OA Framework still seems to be responding).

applmgr@myhostname$> $SCRIPT_TOP/adapcctl.sh status

You are running adapcctl.sh version 120.7.12010000.2
Checking status of OPMN managed Oracle HTTP Server (OHS) instance ...
Processes in Instance: ENV_ID.myhostname
---------------------------------+--------------------+---------+---------
ias-component                    | process-type       |     pid | status 
---------------------------------+--------------------+---------+---------
OC4JGroup:default_group          | OC4J:oafm          |   16788 | Alive  
OC4JGroup:default_group          | OC4J:forms         |   16709 | Alive  
OC4JGroup:default_group          | OC4J:oacore        |   21689 | Alive  
HTTP_Server                      | HTTP_Server        |   16494 | Stop

OEM will show the HTTP service as being down, even though the pages are probably still responding:

R12 EBS OEM AMS monitor HTTP Service down screenshot
R12 EBS OEM AMS monitor HTTP Service down screenshot

Implementation for e-Business Suite R12 is relatively easy (just modify 2 configuration files and bounce Apache), but making sure the changes stick after AutoConfig runs means you do need to learn about the configuration templates in $FND_TOP/admin/templates.

These are the skeletal files used during AutoConfig (adautocfg.sh) that regenerate all those files used to control the middleware and database software configuration.  These are the files you that contain warning headers written into each and every one of them warning you not to make direct changes to the configuration file itself like:

# ###############################################################
#
# This file is automatically generated by AutoConfig.  It will be read and
# overwritten.  If you were instructed to edit this file, or if you are not
# able to use the settings created by AutoConfig, refer to Metalink Note
# 387859.1 for assistance.
#
# ###############################################################
)

## Execute on every R12 MT server running HTTP/web services – Apache downtime required during change.
# Stop Apache
$SCRIPT_TOP/adapcctl.sh stop

#  Before change
applmgr@myhostname $> cd $INST_TOP/ora/10.1.3/Apache/Apache/conf
applmgr@myhostname $> grep mutex *

ssl.conf:SSLMutex  file:/ptcharmk/inst/apps/${ENV_ID}/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/ssl_mutex

# Append a line to the existing custom template
echo -e “\nAcceptMutex pthread\n” >> $FND_TOP/admin/template/custom_conf_1013.tmp

# Modify the existing SSL template (doesn’t seem to have a custom include on this one)
vi $FND_TOP/admin/template/ssl_conf_1013.tmp
=============

Comment:  # SSLMutex  file:${INST_TOP}/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/ssl_mutex
Insert:     SSLMutex sem

# Execute AutoConfig

$SCRIPT_TOP/adautocfg.sh -appspass=$APPS_PW

# Re-Start Apache
$SCRIPT_TOP/adapcctl.sh start

# After Change
applmgr@myhostname $> cd $INST_TOP/ora/10.1.3/Apache/Apache/conf
applmgr@myhostname $> grep -i utex $INST_TOP/ora/10.1.3/Apache/Apache/conf/*

custom.conf:AcceptMutex pthread
ssl.conf:# SSLMutex  file:${INST_TOP}/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/ssl_mutex
ssl.conf:SSLMutex  sem

# Confirm semaphore mode is activated

applmgr@myhostname $> grep -i mutex $INST_TOP/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/*
$INST_TOP/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/error_log.1437091200:[Fri Jul 17 11:58:14 2015] [notice] Accept mutex: pthread (Default: fcntl)
$INST_TOP/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/error_log.1437091200:[Fri Jul 17 12:12:12 2015] [notice] Accept mutex: pthread (Default: fcntl)

As mentioned in the MOS document (Doc ID 562624.1), you may need to use ipcs -a to view hanging semaphore processes after making this change, and use ipcrm -s to kill the hanging processes if Apache refuses to startup after making this change and a different issue causes Apache’s processes to hang.

New feature in the 12.1.0.4.x OEM agents – Metrics Browser

Actual content being collected depends on what plugins are available on the agent.

https://(agenthostname):(port)/emd/browser/main

(agenthostname):(port) obtained from $AGENT_HOME/bin/emctl status agent


oem_agent_metric_browser_login_ss1Metric Browser Login

Top of Form

Enter user ID and password:
Agent UserName or root Password

PDP Type
None Sudo PowerBroker

RunAs Username Profile name (only applicable if PowerBroker)
And then click this button:

Bottom of Form


Screenshot of OEM 12.1.0.4.0 Agent Metric Browser
Screenshot of OEM 12.1.0.4.0 Agent Metric Browser

EMAGENT 12.1.0.4.0

Health Meter Score Schedule Properties Upload System Top Target/Metric Cpu Reports System State Dumps Agent Key Performance Charts Agent KPI Charts
100.0 Schedule Properties Upload System Top Target/Metric Cpu Reports System State Dumps Agent Key Performance Charts Agent KPIs

Target List

TargetType TargetName BrokenCode BrokenReason Status Version Runtime Version Blackout Status Master ScheduleStatus HealthScore Severities Schedule CollectionItems Target Events
Host (hostname) 0 MONITORED 4.4 2 false true OPERATIONAL 99.6 Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle Concurrent Processing (ORACLE_SID)-Core Managers for Concurrent Processing 0 MONITORED 12.03 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Custom Oracle Concurrent Program (ORACLE_SID)-AUS_FNDGSCST 0 MONITORED 12.02 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Custom Oracle Concurrent Program (ORACLE_SID)-(ORACLE_SID)_7BK_AGING 0 MONITORED 12.02 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle E-Business Suite Custom Objects (ORACLE_SID)-Oracle E-Business Suite Custom Objects Configuration 0 MONITORED 12.01 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Internal Concurrent Manager (ORACLE_SID)-Internal Concurrent Manager 0 MONITORED 12.02 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle E-Business Suite Node (ORACLE_SID)-Infrastructure (ORACLE_SID)_(hostname)-Database Context 0 MONITORED 12.03 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle E-Business Suite Patch Information (ORACLE_SID)-Oracle E-Business Suite Patch Information Configuration 0 MONITORED 12.03 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle E-Business Suite Workflow (ORACLE_SID)-Workflow Infrastructure 0 MONITORED 12.02 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle Workflow Agent Listener (ORACLE_SID)-Oracle Workflow Agent Listener 0 MONITORED 12.01 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle Workflow Background Engine (ORACLE_SID)-Workflow Background Engine 0 MONITORED 12.01 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle Workflow Notification Mailer (ORACLE_SID)-Oracle Workflow Notification Mailer 0 MONITORED 12.01 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Database Instance (ORACLE_SID) 0 MONITORED 5.3 2 false true OPERATIONAL 99.3 Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Database Instance (ORACLE_SID) 0 MONITORED 5.3 2 false true OPERATIONAL 100.0 Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle E-Business Suite (ORACLE_SID)-Oracle E-Business Suite 0 MONITORED 12.03 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Agent (hostname):(port) 0 MONITORED 12.4 6 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Agent proxy (hostname):(port)_proxy 0 MONITORED 12.01 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle Home OraDb11g_home1_(hostname) 0 MONITORED 2.0 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle Home OraDb11g_home2_(hostname) 0 MONITORED 2.0 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle Home agent12c1_(hostname) 0 MONITORED 2.0 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Oracle Home agent12c2_18_(hostname) 0 MONITORED 2.0 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Listener LISTENER_(hostname) 0 MONITORED 2.7 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events
Listener (ORACLE_SID)_(hostname) 0 MONITORED 2.7 2 false true OPERATIONAL Severities Schedule CollectionItems Events

Timestamp = 2015-06-16T10:37:34.693-07:00

Logout https://(hostname):(port)/emd/browser/logout

Copyright (c) 1996, 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved

Each clickable link allows you to see what each metric being collected is actually collecting, and what the current values that are being passed to the OEM OMS Repository look like.

This is referenced in the My Oracle Support document:

List Of All Metrics In Enterprise Manager 12c Cloud Control (Doc ID 1678449.1)

e-Business Suite Patches ONE-OFF, or Family Pack – My @Oracle Support Searches

One-off patch, then [Search]

Patches & Updates Name or Bug Number (Simple)
Patches & Updates Name or Bug Number (Simple)

Click on the Patch# (link):

Patch Search Results
Patch Search Results

Showing that this particular patch was not superceded by a Family pack release:Patch DescriptionBut in the README.txt – the giveaway is the “Target Mini-pack/Family Pack/Release” – 12.1.4/12.2 means this won’t be incorporated into a 12.1.3 Family pack and will only be included in an eventual 12.1.4 upgrade, or in the 12.2 upgrade.  It would remain a ONE-OFF status for 12.1.3.

Patch README.txt
Patch README.txt

The other approach is going from the RPC downward:

Patches & Updates Product or Family (Advanced)
Patches & Updates Product or Family (Advanced)

For a Functional Overview of this patch please review EBS: R12.1: Receivables

Recommended Patch Collection (RPC), Feb 2015  (Doc ID 1980300.1)

Refer to Doc ID 954704.1 for all Financials Feb 2015 RPCs.

nb – In case it’s useful – you can make a browser shortcut for any My Oracle Support Document ID’s by using the search URL: https://support.oracle.com/epmos/faces/DocContentDisplay?id=(documentID#)

Slow Oracle Database Performance on a NetApp (10g, 11g, 12c) Tips

http://www.netapp.com
http://www.netapp.com

If you have a NetApp storage appliance, device, SAN, whatever you want to call it, review this first (NetApp Best Practices for Oracle Databases – published March 2014): http://www.netapp.com/us/media/tr-3633.pdf

The quick and dirty (for those experiencing Production issues right now):

The database-side init.ora:

grep filesystemio $ORACLE_HOME/dbs/initSID.ora

*.filesystemio_options=’SETALL’

The options for filesystemio_options can be summarized as follows:

  • ASYNCH: Asynchronous I/O. Oracle should submit I/O requests to the operating system for processing. This permits Oracle to carry on with other work rather than waiting for I/O completion and increases parallelization of I/O.
  • DIRECTIO: Direct I/O. Oracle should perform I/O directly against physical files rather than routing I/O through the host operating system cache.
  • NONE: Use synchronous and buffered I/O. In these configurations, the choice between shared and dedicated server processes and the number of dbwriters will become more important.
  • SETALL: Use both asynchronous and direct I/O. (preferred for NetApp)

Note: The filesystemio_options parameter has no effect in DNFS and ASM environments. The use of Direct NFS (DNFS) or Automatic Storage Management (ASM) automatically results in the use of both asynchronous and direct I/O.

However…. Because you might end up cloning to an environment that doesn’t support DNFS (remember it’s stuck in the ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/lib object binary), you should have it set to SETALL anyway to allow fall-back to standard NFS (but with asynch and DI/O.).

[This refers to the: cd $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/lib ; make -f ins_rdbms.mk [dnfs_on / dnfs_off] used to enable and disable DNFS (you also need the /etc/oranfstab created to support this – server:   local:   path: export: mount: etc…)]

If you have 11.2.0.4.x or later (12c) there’s a new DNFS-related init.ora parameter critical for managing packet requests by the database to avoid packet flooding the NFS file server:  Without it (i.e. older versions) DNFS only works well on dedicated DNFS storage because an oracle database on modern hardware can easily over-whelm the NetApp’s ability to service TCP packets (can send upwards of 4,000+ requests per second)

$> grep dnfs $ORACLE_HOME/dbs/initSID.ora

*.dnfs_batch_size=128

On the Linux OS side:

$> grep tcp /etc/sysctl.conf

sunrpc.tcp_slot_table_entries = 128

$> grep nosharecache /etc/fstab

hostname.corp:/vol/testoracled/d01     /u01/app/Oracle              nfs rw,bg,hard,vers=3,proto=tcp,timeo=600,rsize=65536,wsize=65536,nointr,nosharecache

hostname.corp:/vol/testdata            /u01/app/Oracle/oradata     nfs rw,bg,hard,vers=3,proto=tcp,timeo=600,rsize=65536,wsize=65536,nointr,nosharecache

Incidentally, if you want to measure your I/O rates, I have been using SLOB (Silly Little Oracle Basher – http://kevinclosson.wordpress.com/slob/ ) with one small modification to the iostat command in the runit.sh script to capture the I/O activity on all the shares (iostat -mn instead of -xm):

#      ( iostat -xm 3 > iostat.out 2>&1 ) &
( iostat -mn 3 > iostat.out 2>&1 ) &
misc_pids=”${misc_pids} $!”
( vmstat 3 > vmstat.out 2>&1 ) &
misc_pids=”${misc_pids} $!”
( mpstat -P ALL 3  > mpstat.out 2>&1) &
misc_pids=”${misc_pids} $!”

All this besides the usual OEM recommendations (bigger log_buffer, manage SGA size, get block sizes correct), dropped latency from over 40000ms to < 80ms on heavy load, and is producing 12000 IOPS on the same device.

This is an R12 e-Business Suite environment running on an 11.2.0.3.13 (PSU JAN2015) database (5TB).

What triggered this investigation was that the Log Writer process (LGWR) began dumping trace files about 6 months ago with entries that look like:

*** 2014-12-21 19:49:29.827
Warning: log write elapsed time 9988ms, size 1KB

After investigating all the usual suspects about slow disk, I happened upon the aforementioned NetApp white paper. This occurs when multiple hosts are competing for resources under a single NetApp appliance environment (multiple enclosures, multiple dedicated or shared aggregates, etc.)

Situation addressed and under control.

Smartphone Tablet Art Controller App – WiFi Digital Photo Frames Managed by Template

Simple concept – we’ve bought those digital photo frames that can take various memory cards and flash drives to display our photos. And some of them have become WiFi enabled so you can load pictures from your favorite online cloud storage (i.e. Photobucket, Flickr, Snapfish, etc.)

But what about an app to manage such frames all around your house (or office, or college, or whereever?)

Start with a basic photo library app that can build normal collections and folders, but extend the functionality to allow multiple digital photo frames (or even Smart TV’s with WiFi photo RSS feed capability) to be loaded on-demand with your choice of photos on-demand.

SDWiFiCardUse WiFi compatible SD cards like these to provide the basic connectivity, but assign each device (which usually end up with a local IP address) as a controllable frame within the collection application (e.g. Frame 1 (living room), Frame 2 (kitchen), Frame 3 through 5 (hallway), etc.) Now assign those IP’s to a template “gallery” for the App to manage the content and placement.

Simple uses might be: changing all the digital frames in your house to display your best children’s photos during Mother or Father’s Day.  Load historical photos during national holidays. Celebrate a big birthday with a rolling series of funny or serious This is Your Life photos, all being loaded and timed automatically to change at pre-determined intervals.

More advanced use might be professional gallery management, so you can provide previews of gallery forthcoming openings by using inexpensive 11×14 digital frames to give guests an idea of what’s coming next.  Or artists might even end up programming the templates as interactive media showcases or exhibitions unto themselves.

The smartphone or tablet component (or any touchscreen capability)

Set of touchscreen smartphones
Set of touchscreen smartphones

makes it easier to drag and drop photos to specific frames in the template – imagine the application having a basic floorplan of your house with the various digital frames in placeholder positions, so you could drag and drop photos into them as collection sets.  And save them.  And load them instantly.

@jhlui1 #DreamBig #ChangeTheWorld

Multi-path Multiplexed Network Protocol (TCP/IP over MMNP) Redundant Connections

Because connectivity is becoming less a convenience and more often a necessity, if not a criticality, there will be a built-in demand for 24×7 connectivity to/from data sources and targets.

In professional audio, wireless mics used to be a particular problematic technology – while allowing free-roaming around the stage, they were subject to drop-outs and interference from multiple sources, causing unacceptable interruptions in the audio signal quality of a performance. The manufacturers got together and created multi-channel multiplexing allowing transmission of the same signal over multiple channels simultaneously, so that if one channel were interrupted, the other(s) could continue unimpeded and guarantee interruption-free signals.

Now we need the same thing applied to network technology – in particular, the ever-expanding Internet.  Conventional Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) addresses single source and single destination routing.  Each packet of data has sender and receiver information with it, plus a few extra bytes for redundancy and integrity checking, so that the receiver is guaranteed that it receives what was originally sent.

The problem occurs when that primary network connection is lost.  The protcol calls for re-transmit requests and allows for re-tries, but effectively once a connection goes down, it is up to the application to decide how to deal with the disconnection.

The answer may be the same as applied to those wireless microphones.  Imagine two router-connected devices, for example a computer and it’s internet DSL box.  Usually only one wire connects the two and if the wire is broken, lost, disconnected, the transmission halts abruptly.

Now imagine having 2 or 4 Cat-5 cables between the devices, along with a network-layer appliance that takes the original TCP/IP packet from the sender and adds rider packets with it to include a path number (i.e. cable-1 to cable-4), plus a timing packet (similar to SMPTE code) that allows the receiver appliance to ensure packets received out-of-order due to latency in different paths, are re-assembled back in the sequential order as they were transmitted.

Then run these time-stamped and route-encoded duplicate packets through a standard compression and encryption algorithm to negate the effects of the added time and channel packet overhead.

[Addendum: 22-MAY-2015] Think of this time+route concept similar to how BitTorrent operates.  There are already companies working on channel aggregation appliances, but usually for combining bandwidth.  This approach is focused on the signal continuity aspect of the channel communication.

Reverse the process at the receiving end, and repeat the algorithm for the reverse-data path.

Transmitter] — [data+time+channelID] — [compression/decompression ] => (multiple connection routes) => [resequencer] — [Receiver

Time for some creative geniuses to make this happen, yesterday.  Banks need it. Companies need it. Even the communication carriers need this.

@jhlui1 #DreamBig #ChangeTheWorld

R12 e-Business Suite and OEM Monitoring – Oracle Spins Freezes

Every so often, system load on an e-Business Suite instance ramps up and response time to users starts climbing, often resulting in user observed errors such as:

  • FRM-92100 Your connect to the server has been interrupted
  • FRM-92102 A network error has occurred

    FRM-92102 Forms Error R12 EBS
    That dreaded FRM-91201 / FRM-91200 error causing you to restart your session.

Or sometimes, the screen just freezes (aka spins, stops, is broken, stuck, motionless, looks like a screen saver,can’t do anything, won’t work, froze-up, etc.) and the person has to close their browser, or even shut-down their workstation and restart.

It's simply not doing anything - Nothing to see here, just move your cursor around. And wait... and wait.
It’s simply not doing anything – Nothing to see here, just move your cursor around. And wait… and wait.

Old technology often barks with unrelated error messages to the actual cause.  If there’s a lot going on with concurrent requests, or interfaces, or analytic extracts running, the front-end response-time slows down, sometimes sufficiently to trigger these kinds of Form errors, even though technically there was no interruption to the network connectivity, either between the hosts, nor the workstation and the middle-tier application server.

However, on the database, the user-experience can be seen, although not necessarily in the place you might expect.  OEM  had introduced it’s Adaptive Metric Thresholds technology back in OEM 11g (in a slightly different place than in 12c (in Oracle Management Server/OMS 12.1.0.4.0).  In OEM 11g, they were a link under the AWR Baseline Reports page.

OEM 11g AWR Baselines Page
See the Baseline Metric Thresholds link at the bottom.

In OEM 12c, you’ll find them under

Targets -> Database -> Peformance -> Adaptive Thresholds -> Baseline Metric Thresholds -> Edit Thresholds:

OEM 12c Baseline Metric Thresholds
Where those adaptive metric thresholds moved in 12c.

 

 

On this page and in the list of Baseline Metrics, when you click into them, you can access the trending statistics being gathered for each metric.  Many times this will provide direct insight into what a user experiences as the “the system is frozen” translates into “the back-end database response time is incredibly bad.”

OEM 12c Baseline Metric Response Time per Transaction vs. Baseline
See the spikes around 7AM and 11:30AM? Those are being associated with “System Froze” reports.

 

In the example here, the database experienced a dramatic slow-down in response almost 5 to 10 times slower than usual, which only lasted a few seconds. But that can be enough to show up in many users’ sessions who might have just kicked off a query, or were trying to save something.  Based upon the information gathered, we set the Warning and Critical thresholds to 1500ms and 2000ms respectively to start sending e-mail alert notifications upon breach of the levels. If the settings are left at “None”, no incident would be raised, and thus, no notification would be sent.

If you’re experiencing odd transient outages or sluggish behavior that defies the normal AWR and ADDM snapshot analysis, go take a look at what OEM has been gathering in the background over time and see if the statistics correlate to any of your issues.  There’s value in that data. Just mine it.

Hellmann’s Gets The Squeeze on Mayo (aka Best Foods)

Kewpie Mayonnaise
Kewpie mayonnaise with sample squeeze top (image courtesy of Spice-World)

We often use Kewpie around the house, mostly because it happens to come in a non-messy squeeze bottle that is convenient to take on picnics and pass around the table at family gatherings.

Thanks to a free sample from Influenster, the latest forth-coming

Best Foods/Hellmans Squeeze
Hellman’s Mayonnaise new squeezable bottle.

packaging from Hellmann’s (also known on the West coast as Best Foods) has decided to release its quite popular (and lighter than Kewpie) mayonnaise in a new top-down squeeze bottle that comes quite nicely designed to sit upside-down without tipping.  The typical spout that is found on similar ketchup bottles has been made pressure-sensitive allowing a very narrow (2mm) stream of mayo to be sent in a controlled stream accurate enough to write with (or at least make fancy lines and streams) whether decorative, or simply portion-controlling (studies show that using a dab here and there can have just as much taste and schmearing the mayo all over everything, yet saves on serving size big time.)  It’s refillable, and using a smoother plastic interior, is designed to allow most of the mayo to exit the bottle leaving less waste behind (Hellman’s quotes “over 1000 lbs. of mayo are wasted each year just because it’s left behind in bottles and jars)  Look for it coming soon to a grocery shelf near you.

2015-April Shinnyo Podcast Elevations an

2015-April Shinnyo Podcast Elevations and Heightened Expectations http://ow.ly/2WNZlD

2015-April Shinnyo Podcast Elevations and Heightened Expectations

2015-April Shinnyo Podcast Elevations and Heightened Expectations

  • Paradise, Almost.
  • Embracement and Nothingness
  • Waking up and Making Some Coffee (not just thinking about it)

Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard

Lou Lawrence, Port Angeles WA US
Lou Lawrence, Port Angeles WA US

““I hear that this month practitioners are getting ready for my birthday celebration. I’m grateful that you all want to express your appreciation to me in this way. But what I hope for more than anything is for all people to live with joy in their lives. I pray that you will take this occasion as an opportunity to take action so that even one more person can find joy in the world around them.”

— Master Shinjo Ito, 1973

About this same time last year, I described the general process of spiritual elevation at Shinnyo-en and conceptually what it was about. At last month’s meditative sitting, our spiritual guide had a few interesting observations about the Los Angeles training that were worth sharing. He had travelled from Japan, first stopping up in San Francisco, and then Chicago and now in Los Angeles. The first 2 stops were typical of this time of year – still fairly cold and either rainy or snowy outside, and a general feeling of people still hibernating, so to speak. But upon arrival in Los Angeles, whereupon he was greeted with 90+F temperatures, and even now, a rain-less, overly sunny climate that defies historical record, he said “this must be a form of Paradise!”

During our training, he felt we shared a brightness and warmth similar to the weather outside, with much happiness and joy throughout the group. But as the meditation deepened, he felt the room growing darker and dimmer, and our corresponding moods and spirits turning inward and more self-centered. It’s as if we started out with a sense of communal support and joy for our training, and then shifted towards a much more singular “I must elevate. Must focus my thoughts. Be determined.” mindset. And while this sort of internally-centered focus works well for the beginning stages of learning to meditate and clear your mental dissonance, it really doesn’t work to develop the openness and compassion needed to develop embracement and oneness.

Often we find ourselves in this odd balance between the chicken and egg syndrome of sharpening our own mental and spiritual awareness, but at the same time, not shutting out the rest of the world, and ultimately compassion, in the process. it’s a little like the Zen concept of “learn everything, then learn to know nothing.” Learning to accept not only ourselves (which is an important first step), but also the rest of the universe as it is, where it is, and what it is – means embracement (jpn. Shoju or Shojou) in its truest sense.

Remember that when we pay respects to our spiritual figures, we do so as a gentle reminder that we wish to change not only ourselves, but inspire others to have aspirations and positive hope, just as the figure of the Ever-Present Tathagata Shakyamuni represents the timelessness and universality of the Buddha’s enlightenment, in other words, the potential of all people to bring forth their own innate potential (aka buddha nature) to awaken.

To become one with G*d, to walk in Christ’s footsteps, embrace Tao,

Moss or Forest?
Moss or Forest?

develop buddha nature, or simply be a good person – whatever you end up calling the process of incorporating compassionate practice into your daily life, it is the steps you take each and every moment that lead you somewhere else, and not the imagining what it will be like to get there.

“No matter where you go, there you are.”
— Confucius, Buckaroo Banzai, Luca Bloom, et.al.

/* For more information and discussion feel free to e-mail me at jlui at jlui dot net, or twitter @jhlui1; With Gassho _()_, James*/

#C15LV Collaborate 2015 Networking Opportunity Events

Where I can keep track of the special events (note: these are not “parties” as so many people are misled to believe) at Collaborate (April 11-16, 2015 – Las Vegas, Nevada). To attend one of these events:

  1. You’re registered as an Collaborate Attendee.
  2. You’re either a prospect, customer, or goodwill contact for the host.
  3. You visit the host’s booth at Collaborate in order to pick up whatever is required for entry.
  4. Do not just show up at the event and attempt to “crash” it – just spend your time at a regular #C15LV reception the same evening and you’ll still get plenty of party time.

My sessions for this year:

Upgraded Front Brake – Suzuki S40 Boulevard (2013)

DSCF4548Ever search for photos of a Suzuki S40 (nee’ LS650 Savage) and notice everybody shoots from right-side of the bike?SUZUKI-Boulevard-S40-6390_4suzuki205042015553012

I personally think that’s because we’re all painfully aware of how woefully inadequate the 30+ year old solid single front-disc with a single pot caliper has been (especially when freeway speeds started jumping up.) And why would you want to take a photo of something that heats up too fast, feels spongy, even with better brake lines, and isn’t so bad tooling around and cruising at low speeds, but feels like you’re riding a Schwinn Stingray (wherein your rear drum brake locks up, and skids along, while the front is still grabbing air.)

But because of a rather creative genius in the automotive engineering world, he introduces this:

20150320_102028_sm
Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Full Left-side Photo
20150319_165621_sm
Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Front Left-side Photo
20150319_165543_sm
Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Focus Left-side Photo

And now Suzuki S40 and LS 650 (and Ryca conversion) owners can have fully-floating rebuildable discs with dual-pot calipers and bring their bikes into the 21st century (or at least into the last decade of the 20th, if you prefer.)  It’s not ABS (which would cost more than the whole bike) but it’s a welcome upgrade that bolts-on (literally) and is very well-engineered and designed using already proven technology (just assembled in a different way, with an engineer’s eye towards functionality and purpose).

It’s affordable, and just what this little kicker needed among the plethora of engine-specific upgrades that already address more horsepower (web cams, big bore kits, bigger carburetors and jetting, revised exhausts, etc.).

Now you can safely stop this thing.

Sandor (aka Shawn) is one very creative engineer.

Original post (on SuzukiSavage.com): http://suzukisavage.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1391549028/0

http://suzukisavage.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1391549028/0
RycaShawn’s original 2014 post on SuzukiSavage.com – with continual development updates on making it affordable and even more practical.

 

If you Care a Little More, Things Happen. Bees can be dangerous. Always wear protective clothing when approaching or dealing with bees. Do not approach or handle bees without proper instruction and training.

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