#C15LV Collaborate 2015 Networking Opportunity Events

Where I can keep track of the special events (note: these are not “parties” as so many people are misled to believe) at Collaborate (April 11-16, 2015 – Las Vegas, Nevada). To attend one of these events:

  1. You’re registered as an Collaborate Attendee.
  2. You’re either a prospect, customer, or goodwill contact for the host.
  3. You visit the host’s booth at Collaborate in order to pick up whatever is required for entry.
  4. Do not just show up at the event and attempt to “crash” it – just spend your time at a regular #C15LV reception the same evening and you’ll still get plenty of party time.

My sessions for this year:

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Upgraded Front Brake – Suzuki S40 Boulevard (2013)

DSCF4548Ever search for photos of a Suzuki S40 (nee’ LS650 Savage) and notice everybody shoots from right-side of the bike?SUZUKI-Boulevard-S40-6390_4suzuki205042015553012

I personally think that’s because we’re all painfully aware of how woefully inadequate the 30+ year old solid single front-disc with a single pot caliper has been (especially when freeway speeds started jumping up.) And why would you want to take a photo of something that heats up too fast, feels spongy, even with better brake lines, and isn’t so bad tooling around and cruising at low speeds, but feels like you’re riding a Schwinn Stingray (wherein your rear drum brake locks up, and skids along, while the front is still grabbing air.)

But because of a rather creative genius in the automotive engineering world, he introduces this:

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Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Full Left-side Photo
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Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Front Left-side Photo
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Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Focus Left-side Photo

And now Suzuki S40 and LS 650 (and Ryca conversion) owners can have fully-floating rebuildable discs with dual-pot calipers and bring their bikes into the 21st century (or at least into the last decade of the 20th, if you prefer.)  It’s not ABS (which would cost more than the whole bike) but it’s a welcome upgrade that bolts-on (literally) and is very well-engineered and designed using already proven technology (just assembled in a different way, with an engineer’s eye towards functionality and purpose).

It’s affordable, and just what this little kicker needed among the plethora of engine-specific upgrades that already address more horsepower (web cams, big bore kits, bigger carburetors and jetting, revised exhausts, etc.).

Now you can safely stop this thing.

Sandor (aka Shawn) is one very creative engineer.

Original post (on SuzukiSavage.com): http://suzukisavage.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1391549028/0

http://suzukisavage.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1391549028/0
RycaShawn’s original 2014 post on SuzukiSavage.com – with continual development updates on making it affordable and even more practical.

 

2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understandi

2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact – 2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact Responding to Icky Moments 1 -> 10 -> 10 million Every Seed is Important Try Not to Watch Your Pot When Boiling Water A Snowflake Starts an Avalanche Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard There are many inconsistent and confusing examples of contradictory spiritual behavior … Continue reading 2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact → http://ow.ly/2VjYzP

2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact

2015-March Shinnyo Podcast – Understanding Impact

  • Responding to Icky Moments
  • 1 -> 10 -> 10 million
  • Every Seed is Important
  • Try Not to Watch Your Pot When Boiling Water
  • A Snowflake Starts an Avalanche

Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard

rain_bird
Found on YouTube

There are many inconsistent and confusing examples of contradictory spiritual behavior in the world. We seem to have buddhist monks behaving aggressively in Myanmar, people beheading people in the name of a belief system, children with explosives strapped to themselves being sent as human bomb carriers, and in Japan, toxins were unleashed on the public in a subway all in the name of a religion or belief system. 1,000 years ago, we had the Crusades marching across a continent in the name of spiritual liberation. Last month we talked about alignment between actions and our principles. But what exactly happens when misalignment occurs?

When we witness behavior that is contrary to our beliefs, humans generate a typical “fight or flight” emotional response. This is part of our built-in survival mechanism to avoid things that make us shudder, go “Eeek!” or “Blechh!” and generally keep us sane because we reinforce our own belief system. If you were in a constant state of questioning your own beliefs, you might find yourself overwhelmed by a sense of confusion or disarray in a very short time. But these are all short-term and immediate responses to aversive behavior. What I find more interesting is the relationship between these exposures to repellant behavior and what we call Karma or the concept of how positive and negative actions have impact over time.

Let’s say someone is harmed or killed in the name of a particular belief, that is the victim is perceived as being an enemy of the beliefs, or otherwise would cause some kind of harm to it. And the person who causes the harm or death is not directly impacted or addressed by their actions, meaning a witness or onlooker doesn’t see an individual person as the cause of the negative action –  we don’t perceive someone specific to blame for the incident. To keep this example simple, 10 random people witness this act. What happens in these 10 different impressions of the action of one person? What happens when this same act is magnified by media coverage to expose this same act to 10 million random people? What if it were just you, who saw what happened?  What would you do? What would you say to others? What if you did absolutely nothing?

The parents, family, friends, and even enemies of the person who performed the act above have impressions, too. And each of those people create a downstream effect of how that act will be perceived by generation upon generation of others. Was it good or bad? Was it righteous or tyrannical? Was it selfish, or generous? Each of these individuals contributes to future actions of whether this one act will be repeated in the future, and to what extent it will occur (positive perception generally leads to magnification of the effort).

In the nature of cause and effect, each of the above actions or inactions results in something else. The seed that doesn’t get planted, doesn’t result in a plant, which doesn’t have roots that hold soil, which results in:

  • the dirt can more easily be washed away in the rain,
  • one fewer plant to grow and filter the air,
  • one fewer parent plant to produce seeds,
  • less shade on the ground leading to hotter soil temperatures,
  • one fewer plant to act as a home to a few insects,
  • and so on.

plant_in_hand_thYet, all it takes is one positive act to have the same and opposite effect. Whether you “Do unto others..,” “Pay it Forward,” watch for “Butterfly Effects” or plant a seed, things start to happen when you do something. The odd and sometimes frustrating thing is that in all of these actions, there is no guarantee of instant gratification of seeing the results of your action. It may happen centuries in the future. This is why detachment from attachments is emphasized in philosophy; try to not have the expectation of a result every time you cause something to happen. By becoming an agent of change, you automatically subscribe to the results – you really don’t need to sit around and wait for the “Lessons Learned” meeting to happen.

Photo courtesy of Earth Science Picture of the Day @esra.edu
Photo courtesy of Earth Science Picture of the Day @esra.edu

The concept of inertial change isn’t new. Over 40 years ago, John Naisbitt wrote about Megatrends and studied how they occur and what we can learn from them. 40,000 years ago, someone scratched into the wall of a cave that a big four-legged animal might be a thing to eat and feed a village, or you could plant something and get a similar result. Ultimately, how do you react to things and how do you affect your downstream relationships (all 10 generations worth)?

/* For more information and discussion feel free to e-mail me at jlui at jlui dot net, or twitter @jhlui1; With Gassho _()_, James*/