Java 7 (1.7.0_) and Java 6 on the Same Workstation for R12 e-Business Suite EBS and other Apps

The challenge: We have a number of 3rd party Cloud applications that are still on Java 6, so we have that version (1.6.0_26 specifically) deployed to our workstations. We configured R12 to use 1.6.0_26 on the server side to minimize impact to the users. We are now implementing Informatica Information Lifecycle Management (an archive and purge technology), which has a component (the Enterprise Data Manager – EDM) which is a Java 7-based application used by certain administrative and analyst users. We needed to have those users support both Java 7 and Java 6 on the same workstation for the browsers (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome).

Starting with a Windows 7 (32-bit) workstation with a working Java 1.6.0_26 installed (and 1.6.0_7 disabled).

Used the Java SE 7 SDK from the Oracle Java Archive (staged to the DBA Share /Software/Java because the 7 downloadables will be pulled from the site as of April-2015):

Chose: Java SE Development Kit 7u25 (includes the JRE runtime edition) – newer versions (post- and including update 40) contain an non-bypassable Security Warning message for using Java 6 applications.

Installed Java 7 using default parameters and completed successfully.

Open the Java Control Panel (available in the Toolbar, as the Java coffee cup icon, if a Java application is already running – e.g. EBS; or via Control Panel -> Java)

Preferred Enabled settings under the [Java] tab -> View…



De-select the Java Plug-in (next-generation) features (due to co-existence with Java 6) – we also turn off Automatic Java Updates, and default the automatic JNLP MIME/execution association setting to make it easier for users:


Launch Informatica EDM:


Java Update Needed – Check (Do not ask again) -> Select -> Later


Choose default launcher for EDM’s JNLP (also can be defaulted in the Java Control Panel -> Advanced settings)


EDM Launches:



Launching R12 e-Business Suite under Java 6:

Launch Forms Session (Profile -> System used as an example)

Security Warning – due to Java having incomplete Certificate Authority trust to the Aramark Hosts (can be addressed also via Control Panel -> Java -> [Security] -> Manage Certificates -> Import Certificate -> add certificates provided by AUS Server Team (password required).

The Java 7 update 25 warning looks like this (click the Activate Java link; then on the next pop-up click Allow and Remember – to suppress future warning messages):


The post-Java 7 update 40 warning looks like this (select – I accept the risk; click [Run]):



Why don’t I see the option to select Do not show this again for this app in the security dialog for an unsigned application?

Starting with Java 7 Update 40, the option to select Do not show this again for this app is no longer available. Unlike previous versions a user cannot suppress the security dialog for an unsigned application and will have to select the option, I accept the risk and want to run this app, each time to run the unsigned application.

Security Warning – these will come up twice in a row – once when the R12 forms servlet is instantiating and a second time when the actual Forms launch. Once Allow this application to run with the requested version (1.6.0_26) is selected, these warnings should be suppressed in future sessions.


R12 and EDM simultaneously launched successfully.



2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness

2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness of Needs – 2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness of Needs Defining Selflessness Qualifying our Conversations Know Yourself as You Get to Know Others The Difficult Task of Acting as Themselves Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard From the Shinnyo 2015 Annual Guidance notes: This year’s items of practice: Contributing to the world through selfless … Continue reading 2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness …

2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness of Needs

2015-January Shinnyo Podcast – Awareness of Needs

  • Defining Selflessness
  • Qualifying our Conversations
  • Know Yourself as You Get to Know Others
  • The Difficult Task of Acting as Themselves

Subscribe to this Podcast (RSS) or iTunes or via Flipboard

Hitsuji - Year of the Sheep
calligraphy by Shinso Ito

From the Shinnyo 2015 Annual Guidance notes:

This year’s items of practice:

  1. Contributing to the world through selfless acts
  2. Nurturing good roots through practice

Guidelines are simple, until you read them. Let’s take a look at “selfless acts”  By definition those would be acts for anyone (or anything) other than yourself.  But if you thought someone needed something, isn’t that a selfless act? When you look in a mirror are you able to see yourself as others see you? This is why doctors and scientists invest so much of their education learning diagnostic and forensic routines, because really what you see and perceive is being filtered through a mind that was produced as the sum total of your entire life’s experiences (good and bad), and that results in an alteration of the perception.

The observation that “we are our own worst critics” is another way to see the same dilemma. We can’t judge ourselves very accurately nor constructively, so how good can we be at judging others? How can we possibly guess what the other person’s need is if we can’t trust our own perception of that need? We listen to the other person. By listening carefully and with clarification of what we are hearing, we can come much closer to an accurate, if less self-satisfying answer.

[reit: the model of the sales cycle is used herein because the accuracy of the communication cycle directly and measurably relates to the satisfaction level of both parties involved, whether material, financial or even emotional satisfaction with the process – in other words, it’s simpler to study and understand]

Continuing the discussion of the principles of selling, in order to “qualify the customer,” we intend to determine several things; () will indicate the sales-related concepts:

  • Identify the person’s needs (what do they want to achieve)
  • Determine if anything we have to offer would fulfill any of those needs (what do we sell that meets that want)
  • Establish ability for the person to adopt fulfillment of the need (are they willing to buy it)
  • Find out if the person is willing to pursue the change needed complete the transaction.(write up the sale)

Note that not one of these asks, “Can the person afford what we are selling?” “Does the person have actual skill or talent needed to use what they are buying?”  That’s the big difference between basic selling and the basis for this podcast – setting a good example for others through living. Selling is about addressing immediate needs, often because in a competitive market, you can never be sure how loyal a customer can be for each and every sale. We might feel better as a customer, if the salesperson simply said, “You know… I don’t recommend you buy this. You’ll never really be able to do with it what you want to accomplish.”  But that salesperson’s livelihood depends on the sales dollars, and not so much good (or bad) advice.

The odd thing is we often approach giving support to others in the same fashion. We take a guess at what they are trying to achieve, and immediately try to provide a solution that in our mind would solve everything. That would be akin to having a conversation with a friend such as,

“Hi, how are you doing?”

“I’m okay. Just a little depressed these days.”

“I know. Just follow these 12 steps, join this program, and start doing this training course, and you’ll be all better forever! Just follow me, and sign here.”

In our interactions with others, it always reinforces the likelihood of having a successful communication by listening first. If you feel motivated to start a conversation with a someone because you wanted to vent about how stressful life had become, or to listen to all of your recent triumphs and accomplishments, that conversation would probably be better received if you asked permission of the other person first, “I just had a horrible experience. Do you mind listening?” And be sure that response is an affirmative, “Yes, I’m ready to listen,” and not a qualified, “Yeah, sure.”
By starting with self-reflection, whether through meditation, counseling groups, journaling, or whatever works for you, the discovery of what makes you move, feel and grow (or conversely shrink, avoid and immobilize) leads to transformation of how you deal with others, and ultimately reinforcement of every relationship you share with others.

This reminds me of an interesting observation about actors and acting (which often comes up during the “Why do we want to become an actor?” portion of many introductory workshops on the subject.) Actors are often more comfortable being extremely detailed and emotionally-rich when playing anyone other than themselves. That’s not to say they don’t like themselves, or don’t like looking into mirrors. But they develop a certain skill at being able to portray a character with amplified attributes, and can emotionally invest in that character in a way which is not as simple to do with themselves.

Why does it feel safer to play a homicidal maniac (or hopelessly romantic) character than dealing with one’s own neuroses and troubles? Because actors have their own “safe word” – the director says, “Cut!” In life, we are the only ones who have the true capacity to tell ourselves, “Cut!” – meaning that’s enough, you did it, let’s move on.  Psychologically, when you know there’s an end to the pain, madness, sadness, endless joy, or any of these hyperbolic emotional states, it’s easier for you to “go there” and realize you can come back.  When you “go there” and don’t come back, we term that as psychosis, and identifying that by yourself is pretty difficult.

In buddhism, we talk about how we are the product of 10 prior generations of our ancestry. That’s how far back (or far forward) every action you or someone else takes, affects someone else, whether you know them or not (and most likely, not.) The reasoning behind the generations is because as a communal species, we reproduce generally with those whom have had a significant influence on our lives. If ten generations of lovingkindness and care-filled harmonious parentage produced you, the likelihood that you’re pretty worry-free and emotionally content is pretty high. For those of us with a less than perfect 10 generation lineage (which is about 99.999998% of people), there’s many reasons we feel the need for dependency, infidelity, lying, stealing or attraction to wealth, power, elitism and arrogance. We can point a finger at any of those 10 generations worth of individuals and declare, “Hah! That’s why I do that!”  Or, you can take action and do something about it.

For completeness, this year’s 2015 annual guideline is:

As we enhance Oyasono,
Let us further share the light of saisho—as revealed in shinnyo
In the spirit of upholding the Dharma.