Tag Archives: truth

Top 7 Reasons Organizations Should Not Automatically Switch to Hosted Enterprise Technology

Cloud with No Symbol
Not Cloud?

A college education can make you think differently.  As I read the original article, the many times my Statistics professors pointed out that anyone can basically lie with numbers to make them support whichever position they want. This was equally true in a class I took on Mass Persuasion and Propaganda.

Thus I present this same article, with an inversion of the concluded statistical results of the IDG survey, with minor modifications to the explanations given to suit the results of the measures.  Respect given to the original author, Tori Ballantine, who is a product marketing lead at Hyland Cloud.  No offense is intended by this grammatical exercise in statistical results inversion.

Original Article:

Top 7 Reasons Manufacturers Should Host Enterprise Technology
https://www.mbtmag.com/article/2018/07/top-7-reasons-manufacturers-should-host-enterprise-technology

Top 7 Reasons Organizations Should Not Automatically Switch to Hosted or Cloud Enterprise Technology

As one of the leading industries that was an early adopter of process automation, manufacturing is often ahead of the curve when it comes to seeking ways to improve processes — yet still has work to do in the technology adoption realm. While the trend for cloud adoption is increasing over on-premises solutions overall, some organizations, including manufacturers, are hesitant to make the transition to the cloud.

There are countless compelling reasons to transition to hosted enterprise applications. According to a recent survey from IDG, IT leaders at companies with 250+ employees, from a wide range of industries and company sizes, agreed on seven areas where cloud computing should benefit their organizations. These included:

Disaster Recovery

Disasters, both natural and man-made, are inherently unpredictable. When the worst-case scenario happens, organizations need improved disaster recovery capabilities in place — including the economic resources to replicate content in multiple locations. According to the IDG survey, about 33 percent, of IT leaders did not find disaster recovery as the number one reason they would move, or have moved to hosted enterprise solutions. By switching to a hosted solution, about 1/3 of organizations could not get their crucial application running as soon as possible after an emergent situation, and are therefore unable to serve their customers.

Data Availability

IT leaders know that data and content are essential components of their daily business operations. In fact, according to the IDG research, 45 percent of survey participant listed data availability as the second leading limitation cited about cloud enterprise applications being unable to provide. Access to mission-critical information, when they need it, wherever they are, is essential for organizations to stay competitive and provide uninterrupted service. With no noticeable increase to uptime compared to on-premises applications, hosted solutions did not provide 24/7/365 data availability.

Cost Savings

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that the third most popular reason IT leaders seek cloud solutions is because of cost savings. Hosting in the cloud eliminates the need for upfront investment in hardware and the expense of maintaining and updated hosting infrastructure by shifting the cost basis to long-term operational costs. While hosting software solutions on-premises carries more than just risk; it carries a fair amount of operational costs. By hosting enterprise solutions in the cloud, organizations will reduce capital costs with a possible reduction in operating costs — including staffing, overtime, maintenance and physical security when centralized under a hosting provider.

Incident Response

The IDG survey found that 55 percent of IT professionals listed incident response as another area where cloud solutions provided no significant benefit over on-premises options. Large-scale systems can develop more efficient incident response capabilities, and improve incident response times compared to smaller, non-consolidated systems. As seconds tick by, compliance fines can increase along with end-user dissatisfaction. So having a quick incident response time is essential to reduce risk and ensure end-user satisfaction.

Security Expertise

The best providers that offer hosted solutions constantly evaluate and evolve their practices to protect customers’ data. This is crucial because up to 59 percent of IDG survey responders noted that security expertise as another leading reason they do not select cloud applications. Organizations with cloud-hosted applications could take advantage of the aggregated security expertise from their vendors to improve their own operations and make sure information is safe, but only by complying with externally-driven security standards that were either not enforceable due to application restrictions (legacy versioning, design constraints, third-party non-compliant architecture, et.al.) To ensure your content stays safe, it’s important to seek cloud providers with the right credentials — look for certifications such as SOC 1 and 2 or 3 audited, ISO 27001 and CSA STAR Registrant.

Geographical Disbursement

The IDG survey found that over 63 percent of IT professionals were not seeking geographical disbursement in where their data is stored. In the event of data unavailability in a local data center, having a copy of the data in a separate geographical area ensures performance and availability of the data sources, though resources to use the data may not be readily available as they are co-located in the local region of the primary data.

Expert Access

IT professionals seek hosted solutions because the best hosted software applications employ top-notch security professionals. Gaining access to these professionals’ insight helps ensure concerns are addressed and the software delivers on the organization’s needs.

In order to facilitate the best possible experience for your customers, it’s important to keep up with technology trends that give you the data and insights you need to provide quality service. For many firms, it means not only focusing on process automation on the manufacturing floor, but also within the internal processes driven by data. There’s a huge shift happening with how organizations choose to deploy software. In fact, according to a recent AIIM study, almost 25% of respondents from all industries are not seeking to deploy cloud software in any fashion. 60 percent of those surveyed plan to focus on a non-hybrid approach, focusing primarily on leveraging on-premises deployments, while 38 percent said they will deploy cloud solutions.

As noted in the seven areas above, the reasons for the lack of shift to selecting hosted enterprise applications are diverse and compelling. The cloud provides users with greater access to their information, when and where they need to access it — and doesn’t confine users to a on-premise data source. When combined with the other benefits of improved business continuity, cost savings, incident response, security expertise and expert access, organizations should carefully consider that their important information and content is more available and secure in the cloud.

 

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2012-October Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Building a Trusted Reputation

2012-October Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Building a Trusted Reputation

The Importance of Establishing Trust
Consistency Builds a Foundation
Learning to Say, “Yes…”
Choosing the Difficult Path
2012-October Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Building a Trusted Reputation


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During an interview recently, Keishu-sama was asked, “What would you most like to be remembered for in this world?” She replied without hesitation, “Not to be formally recognized or rewarded, but to be a person who can be relied upon and trusted – to be a dependable person.”

The timeliness of this idea is quite unmistakable. On TED.com Rachel Botsman spoke this month on how a person’s reputation will become the new perception of an individual’s value, especially out in the virtual internet universe, where we will meet virtual strangers every day and virtual identities are only as genuine as the ratings or comments of others.  In this discussion there is a clear line drawn between one’s Influence (as measured by Likes, Re-Tweets, Follows and Facebook Friends) and one’s Trustworthiness (measured by positive Comments, Recommendations by others, and References by others to your own comments and opinions.)  Botsman points out that the ability to have a positive outcome from a business activity has a direct correlation to your own rather difficult-to-measure Trust factor, and has almost no relation to one’s credit score (FICO), virtual Likes or Influence rating.

So how do you go about building a good reputation?  Trust by others starts with actions towards the benefit of others. It’s easy not to trust someone who is always thinking of themselves first, or doing things in a selfish manner. Even more interesting are those who firmly believe they are making efforts for others, and yet are not sources of inspiration and seem to be beset by troubles and conflicts. The person who always barters is a good negotiator, but seldom trusted. And yet, it’s even simpler to trust someone who always acts by thinking of others first, placing themselves in “the other person’s shoes” and doing things which have no direct correlation with a reward.

Those actions must also have a consistency to them, similar to a river or stream that never dries up.  We think fondly of returning to the cool waters of an ever-present water source to refresh ourselves and cleanse our bodies and minds, but we don’t have that same affinity towards a tributary that only runs randomly, sometimes in great gushes, and other times a mere trickle. We seek every day, to find our own reliable and trustworthy sources of our own sustenance, and that includes those who inspire us and motivate us in life.

If we reflect on the Four Virtues of a Bodhisattva: Permanence (eternity or timelessness), Bliss (happiness), Self (identity or confidence), and Purity (truth)  (Jpn. Jo Raku Ga Jo) each one is attainable only through consistent practice. Each one can be soiled each time someone strays from these invaluable measures. But someone who endeavors to hold true each one of these ideals in their daily life and interactions, becomes by their actions, a trustworthy person because of their consistency and diligence to pursue them.

In a customer service training held by the Telephone Doctor, they introduce verbal phone etiquette choices that enhance communication skills for people dealing with others. The principles are the same in their training – learn to act as you would wish to be treated by putting yourself into the other person’s place before deciding how to react.

Instead of… Try using…
I don’t know. That’s a good question. Let me find out.
I can’t do… Well, what I can do…
You have to… What you need to do…
Just a second… This may take a minute. Can you hold?
No. <…> I can do <something instead>
<silence> (as a response to anything) <say something…>

When you hear the latter responses and imagine a person you’re dealing with responding that way with a smile, can you imagine feeling a little better about the response to your question, even if it happens to be not exactly what you were expecting?

It is very easy it seems to do the opposite of the Four Virtues, much like taking an elevator to the top of a mountain, versus climbing a rocky and steep path along the rocks. You can exhibit impatience, anger or frustration, lack of commitment and lying with as much ease as entering that express lift. Just as taking the stairs once in awhile strengthens our heart and muscles, so does choosing discipline in Life over convenience. We learn more from our difficulties than we ever do from our easy achievements. The interesting change of perspective that transforms the world around you is when you start seeing those challenges in terms of their presented opportunities rather than their burdens. As Life’s hurdles transform into steps, you might find your spiritual strength increasing as you exercise your free will.

2012-September Shinnyo-en Buddhism Month

2012-September Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Truth, Self and Goodness http://ow.ly/1mg318

2012-September Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Truth, Self and Goodness

2012-September Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Truth, Self and Goodness

Learning Oneness With Truth
Selfish Behavior or Why is the World So Cruel (to Me)?
On Being a Good Person

Audio File: 2012-September Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Truth, Self and Goodness

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September was the month when the core chant of our sangha was established as “Namu Shinnyo Ichinyo Dai Hatsu-Nehan Kyo.” Namu is an expression of devotion and trust; shinnyo is the truth or purity (Skt. tathata); ichinyo means oneness; and Dai Hatsu-Nehan Kyo is the Mahaparinirvana Sutra, also representing heaven. This mantra expresses the intent to be one with truth through the principles of the Mahaparinirvana (Nirvana) Sutra.  By chanting the Sandai, and ingraining its focus into our daily lives and actions, we come to recognize our true selves as described in the Sacred Principles – the verses that we recite as part of our daily chanting:

Like the full moon is pure, one is essentially without tarnish.
Like the full moon is round and perfect, one lacks nothing.
Like the full moon is clear, one is essentially the untarnished Dharma.

Master Shinjo Ito taught that the Sandai was a distillation of the essence of the Mahaparinirvana Sutra.  The Sandai voices our intention to change our lives and awaken to our true buddha nature by stepping forward with gratitude and joy for the benefit of others. Psychologically, when we incorporate an idea or thought using more than one of our senses, we tend to better remember it. This is a well-known practice of many advanced childhood learning programs, such as Montessori – to impress the idea in the mind, not only by reading it, but by reading it aloud, and preferably accompanying it with a reinforcing action. So, as we chant the words aloud, we also meditate and think about its meaning, and when we put the words into action, we will incorporate it into our lives. In this process, we begin to purify ourselves of the “Three Poisons” of greed, anger, and ignorance.

Almost fifty years ago, Shojushinin said: “I hope that you can become someone whom others point to and say, ‘That’s a really good person!’ When others recognize that you have changed through your practice [of the Shinnyo Teaching] and they want to give it a try themselves, that’s when you’ll know you’ve actually changed.” The core value within Shinnyo-en is to be the example for others through your actions, life and behavior. The human potential movement of the 1970’s and 80’s used to say, “All love flows through your own love for You.” Many people back then interpreted those words to mean an ego-centric interpretation, leading to the “Me” decade. As a student of many years of those same programs, we learned what the larger meaning of self-appreciation and respect embraces. You are part of a greater whole, whether you define that as a society, the human race, or even the universe. Thus as your eyes open wider and can see yourself in those who are around you, and learn to have the same caring and appreciation for others as you would wish for yourself, that same energy and spirit embraces you in return.

The aim of the Sandai is for us to deepen our resolve to walk the Shinnyo Path towards buddhahood—actualizing the full potential of the buddha nature latent within each of us—and helping others to do the same. A first step is to express the warmth and kindness expounded in the Teaching through our words and actions as we work for the good of those around us in our daily lives. Finding true happiness and creating a better world for everyone begins with changing ourselves.

There is one of many interesting anecdotal stories presented in this month’s Nirvana about a situation in dealing with selfish behavior. Our daily lives offer up a wealth of experiences that we
may be tempted to interpret through the lens of the Self, leading us to blame others or recoil at what they say and do. But what if, on every occasion, the message of Truth is actually hidden within? By focusing on grasping the message and learning to gently suppress our instinctual self-centered tendencies, we can feel the silent but sure encouragement extended to us from
the spiritual realm that up to this point may have passed unnoticed.

An office staff member was preparing to depart for another assignment when she overheard someone say, “Oh, she looks like a runaway…” referring to the staff member’s luggage and travel attire. She was angered by the remark throughout her trip, and upon arrival told Shojushinin-sama, our dharma mother, about the incident.

“So how did you deal with it?” asked Shojushinin. The woman responded, “I thought it was so rude to say something like that, and it made me miserable. I tried hard to reflect on what happened, but I just can’t accept it.”

Shojushinin replied, “Well, then, just think of how the word “runaway” is written with the Chinese characters 家出, meaning “home” (家) and “leave” (出). Reverse these characters to read in the opposite order (出家), and you have the word for “entering the priesthood,” which is what you are actually doing. Now then, what is the difference between 家出 (runaway) and 出家 (entering the priesthood)? Running away from home involves all kinds of pain and suffering, while entering the priesthood leads one to the joy of serving the buddha realm. Try to catch the Buddha’s hidden message in what happened to you this morning as you work to become a full-fledged disciple.”

Shojushinin thus gently explained the importance of attempting to interpret daily events in a buddha-centered way. Viewing life’s challenges in a self-centered way leads to frustration and dissatisfaction. The anecdote above illustrates Shojushinin’s teaching of the significance of contemplation outside of a temple environment. At any given time, we should ask ourselves how to see things from a buddha-centered perspective, which is quite similar to Christianity’s “What Would Jesus Do?” principle of action. The philosophy is the same, with both taking a lot of effort to master the practice.

You learn to perceive daily challenges, not with a “why is Life doing this to me?” attitude, but to see each new hurdle or crack-in-the-road as something you are prepared for at that moment in-time, because the world does not change with intent how it deals with you. You are presented with that which you create for yourself. If you are faced with financial difficulty, it may be lack of experience with dealing with money, or stubbornness not to seek out expertise. If people seem challenging personality-wise or emotionally, might you not be inviting and attracting those people through your actions and behavior?  It is your actions that will create the harmony amid diversity around you. Similarly, most philosophers do not believe in Fate, as we are able to change our actions at every moment in time. Choosing a different path, may lead you to the same destination, but the experience gained will be different, and in-turn, so different will be your future decision-making.

Applying the concept of karma to embrace all actions, one negative action will offset a positive one. Only through consistent and continued accumulation of positively-focused actions can one actually change the balance of how you experience Life. Which also means, every time you think to yourself, “Why is Life doing this to me? I have been a very good person,” you basically reset your merit counter back to zero and get to start all over again. Similarly, doing something good, but expecting a return, whether a reward, or even recognition for the act, is simply bartering, and also results in a zero net-gain.

Whomever first coined the phrase, “Get over yourself,” was on the right track. But to complete the thought with accuracy and purpose, the entire concept probably should be, “Get over yourself, and do something for someone else without expectation.”

2012-August Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly

2012-August Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Attachments & Nature http://ow.ly/1lPBXD

2012-July Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Fo

2012-July Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Living Boddhisattvas / Embracement http://ow.ly/1lb9qF