Tag Archives: stop

@Oracle R12 EBS HTTP Server Error Child Could Not Open Sslmutex Lockfile

HTTP Server Error “Child Could Not Open Sslmutex Lockfile” (Doc ID 562624.1) addresses a non-critical, but annoying issue (because it tends to fill up the $INST_TOP/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache directory with big error logs every day – every mouse click on a OA Framework page generates an error entry).

mod_ossl: Child could not open SSLMutex lockfile /apps/oracle/oas/10.1.3.1/Apache/Apache/logs/ssl_mutex.10549 (System error follows)
System: No such file or directory (errno: 2)

And sort of randomly, your HTTP service will show “Stop” on the adapcctl.sh status screen. But it’s probably still actually running (the processes still show up when ps -ef | grep httpd – and the OA Framework still seems to be responding).

applmgr@myhostname$> $SCRIPT_TOP/adapcctl.sh status

You are running adapcctl.sh version 120.7.12010000.2
Checking status of OPMN managed Oracle HTTP Server (OHS) instance ...
Processes in Instance: ENV_ID.myhostname
---------------------------------+--------------------+---------+---------
ias-component                    | process-type       |     pid | status 
---------------------------------+--------------------+---------+---------
OC4JGroup:default_group          | OC4J:oafm          |   16788 | Alive  
OC4JGroup:default_group          | OC4J:forms         |   16709 | Alive  
OC4JGroup:default_group          | OC4J:oacore        |   21689 | Alive  
HTTP_Server                      | HTTP_Server        |   16494 | Stop

OEM will show the HTTP service as being down, even though the pages are probably still responding:

R12 EBS OEM AMS monitor HTTP Service down screenshot
R12 EBS OEM AMS monitor HTTP Service down screenshot

Implementation for e-Business Suite R12 is relatively easy (just modify 2 configuration files and bounce Apache), but making sure the changes stick after AutoConfig runs means you do need to learn about the configuration templates in $FND_TOP/admin/templates.

These are the skeletal files used during AutoConfig (adautocfg.sh) that regenerate all those files used to control the middleware and database software configuration.  These are the files you that contain warning headers written into each and every one of them warning you not to make direct changes to the configuration file itself like:

# ###############################################################
#
# This file is automatically generated by AutoConfig.  It will be read and
# overwritten.  If you were instructed to edit this file, or if you are not
# able to use the settings created by AutoConfig, refer to Metalink Note
# 387859.1 for assistance.
#
# ###############################################################
)

## Execute on every R12 MT server running HTTP/web services – Apache downtime required during change.
# Stop Apache
$SCRIPT_TOP/adapcctl.sh stop

#  Before change
applmgr@myhostname $> cd $INST_TOP/ora/10.1.3/Apache/Apache/conf
applmgr@myhostname $> grep mutex *

ssl.conf:SSLMutex  file:/ptcharmk/inst/apps/${ENV_ID}/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/ssl_mutex

# Append a line to the existing custom template
echo -e “\nAcceptMutex pthread\n” >> $FND_TOP/admin/template/custom_conf_1013.tmp

# Modify the existing SSL template (doesn’t seem to have a custom include on this one)
vi $FND_TOP/admin/template/ssl_conf_1013.tmp
=============

Comment:  # SSLMutex  file:${INST_TOP}/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/ssl_mutex
Insert:     SSLMutex sem

# Execute AutoConfig

$SCRIPT_TOP/adautocfg.sh -appspass=$APPS_PW

# Re-Start Apache
$SCRIPT_TOP/adapcctl.sh start

# After Change
applmgr@myhostname $> cd $INST_TOP/ora/10.1.3/Apache/Apache/conf
applmgr@myhostname $> grep -i utex $INST_TOP/ora/10.1.3/Apache/Apache/conf/*

custom.conf:AcceptMutex pthread
ssl.conf:# SSLMutex  file:${INST_TOP}/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/ssl_mutex
ssl.conf:SSLMutex  sem

# Confirm semaphore mode is activated

applmgr@myhostname $> grep -i mutex $INST_TOP/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/*
$INST_TOP/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/error_log.1437091200:[Fri Jul 17 11:58:14 2015] [notice] Accept mutex: pthread (Default: fcntl)
$INST_TOP/logs/ora/10.1.3/Apache/error_log.1437091200:[Fri Jul 17 12:12:12 2015] [notice] Accept mutex: pthread (Default: fcntl)

As mentioned in the MOS document (Doc ID 562624.1), you may need to use ipcs -a to view hanging semaphore processes after making this change, and use ipcrm -s to kill the hanging processes if Apache refuses to startup after making this change and a different issue causes Apache’s processes to hang.

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Upgraded Front Brake – Suzuki S40 Boulevard (2013)

DSCF4548Ever search for photos of a Suzuki S40 (nee’ LS650 Savage) and notice everybody shoots from right-side of the bike?SUZUKI-Boulevard-S40-6390_4suzuki205042015553012

I personally think that’s because we’re all painfully aware of how woefully inadequate the 30+ year old solid single front-disc with a single pot caliper has been (especially when freeway speeds started jumping up.) And why would you want to take a photo of something that heats up too fast, feels spongy, even with better brake lines, and isn’t so bad tooling around and cruising at low speeds, but feels like you’re riding a Schwinn Stingray (wherein your rear drum brake locks up, and skids along, while the front is still grabbing air.)

But because of a rather creative genius in the automotive engineering world, he introduces this:

20150320_102028_sm
Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Full Left-side Photo
20150319_165621_sm
Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Front Left-side Photo
20150319_165543_sm
Suzuki S40 Boulevard 2013 with RycaShawn Front Disc Brake Upgrade – Focus Left-side Photo

And now Suzuki S40 and LS 650 (and Ryca conversion) owners can have fully-floating rebuildable discs with dual-pot calipers and bring their bikes into the 21st century (or at least into the last decade of the 20th, if you prefer.)  It’s not ABS (which would cost more than the whole bike) but it’s a welcome upgrade that bolts-on (literally) and is very well-engineered and designed using already proven technology (just assembled in a different way, with an engineer’s eye towards functionality and purpose).

It’s affordable, and just what this little kicker needed among the plethora of engine-specific upgrades that already address more horsepower (web cams, big bore kits, bigger carburetors and jetting, revised exhausts, etc.).

Now you can safely stop this thing.

Sandor (aka Shawn) is one very creative engineer.

Original post (on SuzukiSavage.com): http://suzukisavage.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1391549028/0

http://suzukisavage.com/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1391549028/0
RycaShawn’s original 2014 post on SuzukiSavage.com – with continual development updates on making it affordable and even more practical.

 

Stopping Cell SMS Text Spam (7726)

Cellular phone carriers seem to be a little imbalanced when it comes to marketing.  They over-indulge us with offers to switch, get better phones, go faster, be more hip and stylish.

But when it comes to something actually useful, you have to learn about it by Google‘ing it?

Register your received Spam SMS text messages that get sent to your phone with your local carrier by forwarding it to 7726 (SPAM, if you actually had letters on your phone number buttons)

Because of how SMS was implemented, it’s near impossible to block a specific Spam sender, but at least you can help raise visibility of where they are coming from (even though, the source addresses are probably being spoofed, as well.)