Tag Archives: service

Replace a Yamaha PSR-S900 Keyboard LCD Display

Full  Keyboard
Yamaha PSR-S900 Arranger Keyboard Full-view

I have one of these (Yamaha PSR-S900 Arranger Keyboard Workstation) and after 7 years, the display started going defective – half of the screen was duplicated, lines running through the middle of the display.

Yamaha PSR-S900 LCD Display Going Bad
Yamaha PSR-S900 LCD Display Going Bad (defective)

This renders use of the keyboard relatively impossible (because there is still a composite video out that can be sent to a portable DVD/LCD player, which will still work for the purposes of reading what’s on the display – your patch selections, mixer settings, scoring, sheet music, file selections, etc.)

I hit eBay and found a few replacement display units for about $150 (shipped from China, but made in Japan), and figured it would be worth trying (after all, a new PSR-S950 still runs about $2000.)

The replacement looks like this:

PSR-S900 replacement LCD
Example PSR-S900 replacement LCD image from eBay

There’s a single pair red/white power lead with a small white modular plug used to connect it to the high-voltage power daughterboard. (my plug had one fewer white connections, so I used a modeling knife to trim off the extra middle connector).

PSR-S900 LCD Display - Reverse-side
Example PSR-S900 LCD Display replacement – Reverse-side

The display itself connects via a 10-wire flat ribbon connector that is press-fit into the LCD’s connector. These are the somewhat fragile, but when carefully removed, basically easily re-inserted into the same receptacle (similar to re-wiring a video game console mod.) In the photo, this receptacle is on the right-center side of the display.

Since I didn’t happen to have the service manual, we dive in with the screwdriver (all phillips-head).  Flipping the keyboard over and laying it on a mattress (to avoid scratches,) you’ll find 14 3/4 inch panel screws,  4 slightly longer 1-1/2 inch panel screws used in the center holes of the keyboard, and about 24 larger headed 1-inch panel screws connecting 2 wood panels to the speakers and bottom frame.  You get to remove ALL of these to get the bottom and top shells separated (just keep them in separate dishes/jars.)

The bottom assembly sort of resembles this view from a PSR-1500 (for general reference – the PSR-S900 is more symmetrical in design) The larger screws are connecting the bottom boards to the 2 speaker enclosures and then attaching the wood panels to the bottom plastic shell; the smaller screws go into those taller pyramid-looking tower holes in the bottom case:

PSR-1500 Lower Case Assembly Diagram
PSR-1500 Lower Case Assembly Diagram

This is an interior view of where the LCD is actually mounted (underneath the front panel; this view is of the bottom of the top half of the keyboard):

PSR-S900 LCD Display - front panel mounting (viewed from below)
PSR-S900 LCD Display – front panel mounting (viewed from below)

To access this view, you will be removing the 6 mounting screws holding the CPU board box (the large aluminum vented box sitting on top of the LCD panel area.)  There are grounding wires on 3 sides of this box that are simply attached with more of the small panel screws.  You can either remove the screws that attach the box to the mounting posts, or the screws that hold the posts to the top assembly (whichever ones you can access most easily.)  The only connections I removed to access the LCD were the ethernet cable plugging into the CPU box, and the 2 white multi-wire connections that plug into the back-panel connector board (the one that has the USB plugs, video connectors and MIDI In/Out – it’s mounted to the top (silver) case assembly):

PSR-S900 Back panel connectors
Back panel connectors – top (silver), bottom (black)

Once the CPU box is unmounted and moved aside (untaping the wires that are taped to the box), you can usually access the first 2 (of 4) screws mounting the LCD to the front panel (these are the 2 closest to the keyboard.) You can remove just the screws attaching the LCD to the aluminum mounts (you do not need to remove the mounts themselves).  To access the other 2 (the ones towards the back panel), if you don’t have a right-angle screwdriver that can fit under the back-panel connector board (about 1-inch clearance), you can remove the 6 screws holding the connector board to the top case assembly (4 of these have bendable wire tie-downs on them; the other 2 seem to hold the mylar foil shielding tabs.)  There is also a single screw that connects the coaxial video connector to the back panel that must also be removed to move the board.

PSR-S900 Interior View Open Case Assembly
Yamaha PSR-S900 Interior View Open Case Assembly

Inside my particular model (which might have been an earlier build than the one my replacement LCD was designed to fit) the high voltage board was connected with a longer set of leads to the defective LCD.  So I unmounted it, rotated it clockwise 90 degrees to move the connector closer to the LCD, and re-mounted it using a single screw to hold it in-place again.

After un-mounting the defective LCD, I removed the existing ribbon connector and before mounting the new one, re-attached the ribbon into the new LCD (drawing a line with a marker on the ribbon helps you remember how deep it was plugged in before).  Plugged in the HV power lead and tested the power up to confirm the new display actually works (the first time, there were a bunch of alternating shadows, indicating I hadn’t seated the ribbon connector properly.)

4 screws back in to hold the LCD, 6+1 screws to re-mount the connector board, 6 more to remount the CPU box (and re-connect the ground wires, and 2 of them hold the box shut), then you can shut the case and replace all of those other screws you took out that hold the case together.

Nothing particularly technical – mostly a bunch of screws and tape.  And about an hour and an eBay purchase later, the keyboard is back up and running fine.

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2013-08 Shinnyo-en Buddhism Podcast – The Spirit of Living and Giving

2013-08 Shinnyo-en Buddhism Podcast – The Spirit of Living and Giving

Looking Differently at the Difficulties in Your Path
Serving or Spoiling? What’s the Difference?
Motivation and Recognition to Serve

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The post-Summer activities of Shinnyo-en often follow a bounty of community service events traditionally marking the preparations for a long winter ahead by making sure everyone has enough of what they need to keep going through the coming months. August is also the month we observe and remember the principles and teachings of our Dharma Mother, Shojushin-in.

Shojushin-in herself experienced a childhood that was riddled with hardships. From these, she gained strength of character and the ability to “interpenetrate” with others — meaning she could relate deeply to people and identify with both their struggles and joys. Her warm encouragement and guidance became an indispensable part of the Shinnyo Path and continue to this day to support practitioners in seeing their circumstances differently and in living life with more hope and purpose.

She once said, “Life may throw at you certain difficulties that may not be easily avoided. But when you do your best, acting on your belief that there is no hurdle that cannot be overcome, then a path without regrets will unfold. When you make that kind of effort to overcome a certain hurdle, you will actually feel—personally experience—how the ever-­- present lovingkindness and compassion of the buddha realm constantly support and nurture us.”

In putting into practice, one of the Three Practices, giving service to others, you might find this particular practice takes many different forms. Sometimes it means just giving another person a helping hand to accomplish something or assist someone through their daily life. Other times it might mean placing a bag of the extra fruit or vegetables produced by your garden out on the curb for others to take freely. Maybe it’s participating with a larger group in a community clean-up effort or a public service event.

There is a subtle distinction between being of service and “spoiling” someone. Think about the difference when you ask for or need help from someone because you truly can’t do something versus when you ask because you want to avoid doing it or simply don’t feel like doing it.  This difference is what builds positive merit versus negative merit in terms of overall karma. Encouragement of someone’s avoidance or simply lazy behavior by giving or doing is most often motivated by feelings of guilt — meaning you feel guilty for not giving a panhandler money or a child who begs for another toy.  Compassion comes from being able to “step into the other person’s shoes” and realize how your assistance impacts their lives. Does the act empower the person to change themselves and accomplish more, or does it actually reinforce imbalance and make the person more dependent on donations and gifts?  Think, first.

On August 23, a portion of the Murayama site (1.4M sq. meters of land originally used as a manufacturing plant, acquired by Shinnyo-en in 2002 from the Nissan Motor Company) will be opened to the public. As the first part of our plan to convert it into a more ecologically balanced, green oasis, we have built a soccer field of natural grass that will be officially opened and dedicated with a children’s soccer game. Shinnyo-en plans to further utilize this expansive area for the benefit of the public and is currently working with landscape architects, ecologists, and governmental bodies on projects that include soil enrichment and reforestation according to a recent newsletter from Shinnyo-en’s HH Keishu Shinso.

On September 21  the autumnal Higan (Coming-of-Fall service) in a Christian church for the first time. Called the “Shinnyo Celebration on the Equinox: Sharing the Light of Peace,” it will be held at St. Bart’s Episcopal Church in Manhattan, New York. The next day, September 22, 2013, we will hold another event, this one for the general public: the “Shinnyo Lantern Floating for Peace” in New York City’s Central Park.

In Southern California, on Sunday, September 8, 2013 from 11am to 3pm, the Los Angeles Temple will host its annual Harmony Festival bazaar including food booths, multi-cultural music and workshops, and the ever-popular “garage sale” filled with new and lightly-used items at low prices.  Mostly a financially break-even event, and not a fundraiser, it’s more an exercise in re-balancing those who have excess things giving to those who need them.

Back in 1965, when Shojuishin-in (Shinnyo Dharma Mother) was addressing the Chiryu Gakuin (Missionary School) students, she made the following observation about giving:

“When you wholeheartedly exert yourselves with all your sincerity, then the buddhas, the dharma protectors, and the Two Dojis will surely recognize your efforts. It doesn’t matter whether or not others acknowledge what you’ve done.

If you do your best only when others are around to see your efforts, then you can’t say that your mind and heart are one with those of the buddha realm. We can’t call that way of practice correct.

You’re not the one to recognize or value what you’ve done. That’s something others do. What your actions merit is decided in the buddha realm.”

2012-October Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Building a Trusted Reputation

2012-October Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Building a Trusted Reputation

The Importance of Establishing Trust
Consistency Builds a Foundation
Learning to Say, “Yes…”
Choosing the Difficult Path
2012-October Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Building a Trusted Reputation


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During an interview recently, Keishu-sama was asked, “What would you most like to be remembered for in this world?” She replied without hesitation, “Not to be formally recognized or rewarded, but to be a person who can be relied upon and trusted – to be a dependable person.”

The timeliness of this idea is quite unmistakable. On TED.com Rachel Botsman spoke this month on how a person’s reputation will become the new perception of an individual’s value, especially out in the virtual internet universe, where we will meet virtual strangers every day and virtual identities are only as genuine as the ratings or comments of others.  In this discussion there is a clear line drawn between one’s Influence (as measured by Likes, Re-Tweets, Follows and Facebook Friends) and one’s Trustworthiness (measured by positive Comments, Recommendations by others, and References by others to your own comments and opinions.)  Botsman points out that the ability to have a positive outcome from a business activity has a direct correlation to your own rather difficult-to-measure Trust factor, and has almost no relation to one’s credit score (FICO), virtual Likes or Influence rating.

So how do you go about building a good reputation?  Trust by others starts with actions towards the benefit of others. It’s easy not to trust someone who is always thinking of themselves first, or doing things in a selfish manner. Even more interesting are those who firmly believe they are making efforts for others, and yet are not sources of inspiration and seem to be beset by troubles and conflicts. The person who always barters is a good negotiator, but seldom trusted. And yet, it’s even simpler to trust someone who always acts by thinking of others first, placing themselves in “the other person’s shoes” and doing things which have no direct correlation with a reward.

Those actions must also have a consistency to them, similar to a river or stream that never dries up.  We think fondly of returning to the cool waters of an ever-present water source to refresh ourselves and cleanse our bodies and minds, but we don’t have that same affinity towards a tributary that only runs randomly, sometimes in great gushes, and other times a mere trickle. We seek every day, to find our own reliable and trustworthy sources of our own sustenance, and that includes those who inspire us and motivate us in life.

If we reflect on the Four Virtues of a Bodhisattva: Permanence (eternity or timelessness), Bliss (happiness), Self (identity or confidence), and Purity (truth)  (Jpn. Jo Raku Ga Jo) each one is attainable only through consistent practice. Each one can be soiled each time someone strays from these invaluable measures. But someone who endeavors to hold true each one of these ideals in their daily life and interactions, becomes by their actions, a trustworthy person because of their consistency and diligence to pursue them.

In a customer service training held by the Telephone Doctor, they introduce verbal phone etiquette choices that enhance communication skills for people dealing with others. The principles are the same in their training – learn to act as you would wish to be treated by putting yourself into the other person’s place before deciding how to react.

Instead of… Try using…
I don’t know. That’s a good question. Let me find out.
I can’t do… Well, what I can do…
You have to… What you need to do…
Just a second… This may take a minute. Can you hold?
No. <…> I can do <something instead>
<silence> (as a response to anything) <say something…>

When you hear the latter responses and imagine a person you’re dealing with responding that way with a smile, can you imagine feeling a little better about the response to your question, even if it happens to be not exactly what you were expecting?

It is very easy it seems to do the opposite of the Four Virtues, much like taking an elevator to the top of a mountain, versus climbing a rocky and steep path along the rocks. You can exhibit impatience, anger or frustration, lack of commitment and lying with as much ease as entering that express lift. Just as taking the stairs once in awhile strengthens our heart and muscles, so does choosing discipline in Life over convenience. We learn more from our difficulties than we ever do from our easy achievements. The interesting change of perspective that transforms the world around you is when you start seeing those challenges in terms of their presented opportunities rather than their burdens. As Life’s hurdles transform into steps, you might find your spiritual strength increasing as you exercise your free will.

2012-August Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Attachments & Nature

Learning A Lot From BeesShinnyo Bees (L) | LA River Bees (R)
Having A Purpose
Anger, Aggression, and Acceptance

2012-August Shinnyo-en Buddhism Monthly Focus Podcast – Attachments & Nature

[audio https://jhlui1.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/201208_shinnyo_podcast.mp3]

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The August 2012 Nirvana, the monthly publication of Shinnyo-en, actually deals in depth with the subject of last month’s podcast – The Dharma Crisis.  So rather than duplicating a discussion of what is already available in the August issue, we will focus instead on a subject very near to the heart of the Teachings – in our modern world, learning to value and appreciate Life, and placing less importance on material things.

As many of you know, I am also a beekeeper, or bee-tender, as I discover my self to be, since I’ve discovered it’s pretty much impossible to keep a bee from going where it wants to go. ** I had been a long way on my journey of studies of Buddhist practices when bees entered my path through connection with the Backwards Beekeepers – a group dedicated to the treatment-free and organic practice of raising bees.

What I didn’t know when my journey with bees started, was how much I could learn from them and myself about the natural order of things.

One thing I’ve observed, is that people behave a lot like bees. If you look around your local CostCo store, or a busy mall during the holidays, you’re looking at human-sized bee colony behavior. Bees like surrounding something interesting, whether it’s a queen, or another bee telling where it found a great deal of pollen. Similarly, when you notice people gathered around a food sample station, or a celebrity shows up in a public place, you’re observing the same bee behavior, including the cacophony of people tweeting and Facebook’ing each other about the discovery.

Bees are happiest when they have a clear purpose and daily mission. They get depressed and pretty lazy without a queen to give them focus, or their numbers are too small to maintain a colony. Bees are unlike their cousins the wasps, hornets and yellow-jackets, which have much higher aggressive traits developed from their predatory nature. The cousins also suffer from a much shorter colony lifespan, with the majority of the colony dying within a year of their creation due to natural imbalances and limited resource availability to sustain a predatory colony through the winter. The bees carefully store their nectar and pollen to preserve the colony’s food sources throughout the same period, allowing bee colonies to continue year after year. This becomes their primary purpose throughout their individually short lives (which is usually less than six weeks long) – to help each other to survive, so that the colony as a whole continues.  The queen has a longer lifespan, but must continually deal with brand new individuals who know nothing from day one, other than to begin helping – clean the nest, feed the young, maintain the temperatures, keep out intruders, etc.  Only towards the end of their short lives can they even sting and fly properly – and it is at that time they learn to gather and forage to build a food supply to feed the generations of the future.

If you disorient a bee colony by moving its hive too many times in a row, or disturb them through constant disruption, they will become intolerant of the changes and seek more stable habitats.
That is one feature that bees have that many humans would desire – the ability to fly away from their disturbances. However, in doing so, they must leave their entire known world behind. In this subtle way, bees have learned how to eliminate attachments to their possessions. In focusing on survival of their family and colony, their priorities are to maintain their family and queen leader in safety and health. Even if they must abandon all they have worked so hard to build, collect and store, if nature demands, they quickly consume whatever honey stores they can fit into themselves and depart for a safer and more secure place. The bees know if you can’t carry it with you, it probably isn’t that important.

The term “africanized bees” started with a scientist down in the tropics cross-breeding European honey bees with local feral strains in an attempt to make a heartier and more disease-resistant bee. Tropical bees face many more difficult predators compared with their European cousins and have developed a much more sensitive nature in response to threat detection. Down in the African continent, the tribes for centuries have sought their honey by finding hollow trees with bee colonies in them and using smoke and fire to drive away the bees. This has resulted in the bees developing an aggressive response to smoke – an opposite reaction to typical European bees that become very docile when they can’t smell anything due to the presence of smoke.

Let’s look at things from the bee’s perspective. Bees sting only in defense, not because they want to attack, as they die in the process of doing it, so it makes no sense for them to form premeditated  ideas about attacking other animals. Bees are eat honey, pollen and plant nectar, and have no particular interest in animals. Unlike wasps, hornets and yellowjackets which do prey on insects and animals for food, bees have a built-in instinct to protect their colony and will perish defending it from perceived harm.

But ultra-sensitive or not, a bee simply defends its home from threats. Does this sound like a familiar behavioral trait, perhaps like that of an inner-city gang member or an ex-con from prison protecting their perceived home territory?   Strangely, most bees won’t even defend themselves, if isolated from the colony. Instead they tend to stay quietly with the only purpose left to attempt to return home. Solitary bees accept that they have no defense, other than to fly and exhaust themselves, or attempt to sting, thus ending their life. Those that survive isolation do so by bringing pollen or nectar to contribute to another nearby colony.  Without providing a contribution, a solitary bee cannot be accepted nor maintained, as the entire colony would become weak without contributions. And by nature’s design, a bee cannot survive very long on its own – perhaps 4 or 5 days before they succumb from low temperature exposure or simply being hunted by a larger or stronger insect or bird.

In our pursuit for enlightenment as to how to return to harmony with ourselves and our world around us, we need look no further than the nearest flower, upon which you might find an example of nature’s most complex, and at once, most simple creatures – the honey bee.  In their little efforts they industriously set the wheels of life in-motion by pollinating flowers and allowing plants to grow and multiply for every living thing on the planet.  That’s how much of a difference a single action can make.