Starbucks Does Not Use Two-Phase Commit

Something from geek history blog-wise: http://www.enterpriseintegrationpatterns.com/ramblings/18_starbucks.html

Since it came up this week while discussing Database 12c:

“All of these strategies are different than a two-phase commit that relies on separate prepare and execute steps. In the Starbucks example, a two-phase commit would equate to waiting at the cashier with the receipt and the money on the table until the drink is finished. Then, the drink would be added to the mix. Finally the money, receipt and drink would change hands in one swoop. Neither the cashier nor the customer would be able to leave until the “transaction” is completed. Using such a two-phase-commit approach would certainly kill Starbucks’ business because the number of customers they can serve within a certain time interval would decrease dramatically. This is a good reminder that a two-phase-commit can make life a lot simpler but it can also hurt the free flow of messages (and therefore the scalability) because it has to maintain stateful transaction resources across the flow of multiple, asynchronous actions.”

Gregor is a software architect with Google. He is a frequent speaker on asynchronous messaging and service-oriented architectures and co-authored Enterprise Integration Patterns (Addison-Wesley). His mission is to make integration and distributed system development easier by harvesting common patterns and best practices from many different technologies.
www.eaipatterns.com

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