Adobe Premier Pro CS5 with Native Instruments VST (blacklist.txt)

This is a mock-up of the crash screen - I couldn't get it to come up again after applying the fix herein.

Experimenting with Adobe Premier Pro (Creative Suite 5 / CS5) I have run into the commonly experienced Native Instruments VST plug-in incompatibility issue, wherein PP crashes on startup due to certain code issues.

Rename your VST .DLL‘s with underscore (_) characters instead of space characters in the filename, and place those in the blacklist.txt files (one in each subdirectory containing .DLL’s to be ignored during startup) and Adobe’s products (PP/AE/etc.) should launch correctly.

For example:  I renamed “Kontakt 5 16out.dll” to “Kontakt_5_16out.dll” and inserted that into blacklist.txt and Adobe finally ignored loading it.  Reaper still loads all the NI instruments for me correctly, as does Cakewalk Sonar X10 with the renamed DLL’s.

Guitar Rig 4.dll” becomes “Guitar_Rig_4.dll” and when included in the blacklist.txt in that subdirectory, is ignored successfully during startup of Adobe Premier Pro (Creative Suite 5 – CS5).

A sample blacklist.txt for Kontakt 5:

Kontakt_5_16out.dll
Kontakt_5_8out.dll
Kontakt_5.dll

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2 thoughts on “Adobe Premier Pro CS5 with Native Instruments VST (blacklist.txt)”

  1. Hi. I just came up with this issue and found your input on the matter. I just couldnt figure how someone include something to blacklist. I found the blacklist.xml file in appdata/roaming/steinberg/cubase and opened it with notepad. And all i see is codes with a line my dll files has on it.

    Bias FX is the dll i ve been trying to lunch in cubase. I deleted the blacklist.xml file but i realized, it re-creates it as soon as I open cubase again. Help please 😦

    1. Hi, Alper –

      You should be able to modify the XML version of the blacklist file in a similar manner.

      I would rename the “Bias FX.dll” file as “Bias_FX.dll” and then modify it’s entry in the blacklist.xml (you can use Notepad, or any text editor.) The format of an XML file follows the same as HTML in that each entry has a start tag “&ltTAGNAME&gt” and then a end of the entry marker that looks the same, but it has a slash “/” in front of the TAGNAME “&lt/TAGNAME&gt” – the &lt and &gt are the less-than and greater-than symbols “”.

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